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Transforming Ethnographic Knowledge
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The ethnographic methods that anthropologists first developed to study other cultures—fieldwork, participant observation, dialogue—are now being adapted for a broad array of applications, such as business, conflict resolution and demobilization, wildlife conservation, education, and biomedicine. In Transforming Ethnographic Knowledge, anthropologists trace the changes they have seen in ethnography as a method and as an intellectual approach, and they offer examples of ethnography’s role in social change and its capacity to transform its practitioners.
    Senior scholars Mary Catherine Bateson, Sidney Mintz, and J. Lorand Matory look back at how thinking ethnographically shaped both their work and their lives, and George Marcus suggests that the methods for teaching and training anthropologists need rethinking and updating. The second part of the volume features anthropologists working in sectors where ethnography is finding or claiming new relevance: Kamari Maxine Clarke looks at ethnographers’ involvement (or non-involvement) in military conflict, Csilla Kalocsai employs ethnographic tools to understand the dynamics of corporate management, Rebecca Hardin and Melissa Remis take their own anthropological training into rainforests where wildlife conservation and research meet changing subsistence practices and gendered politics of social difference, and Marcia Inhorn shows how the interests in mobility and diasporic connection that characterize a new generation of ethnographic work also apply to medical technologies, as those mediate fertility and relate to social status in the Middle East.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-34
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  1. Part 1. Living and Teaching Ethnography
  2. pp. 35-36
  1. Participant Observation as a Way of Living
  2. pp. 37-50
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  1. Loveless in the Boondocks: Anthropology at Bay
  2. pp. 51-72
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  1. The Contemporary Desire for Ethnography and Its Implication for Anthropology
  2. pp. 73-90
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  1. Part 2. Doing Transnational Ethnography
  2. pp. 91-92
  1. The Homeward Ship: Analytic Tropes as Maps of and for African-Diaspora Cultural History
  2. pp. 93-112
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  1. Diasporic Dreaming: “Return Reproductive Tourism” to the Middle East
  2. pp. 113-134
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  1. Part 3. Ethnographies in Emerging Sectors
  2. pp. 135-136
  1. Toward a Critically Engaged Ethnographic Practice
  2. pp. 137-159
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  1. Global Assemblages of Business Knowledge and Corporate Ethnography in Hungary’s New Economy
  2. pp. 160-180
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  1. Collaborative Conservation Science: An Anthropological Approach
  2. pp. 181-200
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 201-206
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  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 207-226
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 227-230
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 231-242
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