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As American troops became bogged down first in Iraq and then Afghanistan, a key component of U.S. strategy was to build up local police and security forces in an attempt to establish law and order. This approach, Jeremy Kuzmarov shows, is consistent with practices honed over more than a century in developing nations within the expanding orbit of the American empire. From the conquest of the Philippines and Haiti at the turn of the twentieth century through Cold War interventions and the War on Terror, police training has been valued as a cost-effective means of suppressing radical and nationalist movements, precluding the need for direct U.S. military intervention and thereby avoiding the public opposition it often arouses. Unlike the spectacular but ephemeral pyrotechnics of the battlefield, police training programs have had lasting consequences for countries under the American imperial umbrella, fostering new elites, creating powerful tools of social control, and stifling political reform. These programs have also backfired, breeding widespread resistance, violence, and instability—telltale signs of “blowback” that has done more to undermine than advance U.S. strategic interests abroad.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Abbreviations Used in Text
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-16
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  1. Part I. Taking Up the "White Man's Burden": Imperial Policing in the Philippines and the Caribbean
  2. pp. 17-20
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  1. 1. The First Operation Phoenix: U.S. Colonial Policing in the Philippines and the Blood of Empire
  2. pp. 21-36
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  1. 2. "Popping Off" Sandinistas and Cacos: Police Training in Occupied Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and Nicaragua
  2. pp. 37-52
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  1. Part II. Under the Facade of Benevolence: Police Training and the Cold War in Southeast Asia from the "Reverse Course" to Operation Phoenix
  2. pp. 53-56
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  1. 3. "Their Goal Was Nothing Less than Total Knowledge": Policing in Occupied Japan and the Rise of the National Security Doctrine
  2. pp. 57-78
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  1. 4. "Law in Whose Name, Order for Whose Benefit?" Police Training, "Nation-Building" and Political Repression in Postcolonial South Korea
  2. pp. 79-98
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  1. 5. "Free Government Cannot Exist without Safeguards against Subversion": The Clandestine Cold War in Southeast Asia I
  2. pp. 99-120
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  1. 6. The Secret War in Laos and Other Vietnam Sideshows: The Clandestine Cold War in Southeast Asia II
  2. pp. 121-140
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  1. 7. "As I Recall the Many Tortures": Michigan State University, Operation Phoenix, and the Making of a Police State in South Vietnam
  2. pp. 141-162
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  1. III. The Cold War on the Periphery: Police Training and the Hunt for Subversives in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East
  2. pp. 163-164
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  1. 8. Arming Tyrants I: American Police Training and the Postcolonial Nightmare in Africa
  2. pp. 165-187
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  1. 9. Arming Tyrants II: Police Training and Neocolonialism in the Mediterranean and Middle East
  2. pp. 188-207
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  1. 10. The Dark Side of the Alliance for Progress: Police Training and State Terror in Latin America during the Cold War
  2. pp. 208-231
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  1. Conclusion: The Violence Comes Full Circle-From the Cold War to the War on Terror
  2. pp. 232-252
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  1. Abbreviations Used in Notes
  2. pp. 253-256
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 257-368
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 369-384
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  1. About the Author, Back Cover
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781613761960
Related ISBN
9781558499164
MARC Record
OCLC
835771581
Pages
424
Launched on MUSE
2013-02-13
Language
English
Open Access
No
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