In this Book

Film and Genocide
summary

Film and Genocide brings together scholars of film and of genocide to discuss film representations, both fictional and documentary, of the Holocaust, the Armenian genocide, and genocides in Chile, Australia, Rwanda, and the United States. Since 1955, when Alain Resnais created his experimental documentary Night and Fog about the Nazis’ mass killings of Jews and other ostracized groups, filmmakers have struggled with using this medium to tell such difficult stories, to re-create the sociopolitical contexts of genocide, and to urge awareness and action among viewers. This volume looks at such issues as realism versus fiction, the challenge of depicting atrocities in a manner palatable to spectators and film distributors, the Holocaust film as a model for films about other genocides, and the role of new technologies in disseminating films about genocide.
    Film and Genocide also includes interviews with three film directors, who discuss their experiences in working with deeply disturbing images and bringing hidden stories to life: Irek Dobrowolski, director of The Portraitist (2005) a documentary about Wilhelm Brasse, an Auschwitz-Birkenau prisoner ordered to take more than 40,000 photos at the camp; Nick Hughes, director of 100 Days (2005) a dramatic film about the Rwandan mass killings; and Greg Barker, director of Ghosts of Rwanda (2004), a television documentary for Frontline.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-18
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  1. Part I: Atrocities, Spectatorship, and Memory
  2. p. 19
  1. 1. Film and Atrocity: The Holocaust as Spectacle
  2. pp. 21-44
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  1. 2. Documenting the Holocaust in Orson Welles’s The Stranger
  2. pp. 45-66
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  1. 3. Remembering Revolution after Ruin and Genocide: RecentChilean Documentary Films and the Writing of History
  2. pp. 67-86
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  1. 4. “The Power to Imagine” : Genocide, Exile, and Ethical Memoryin Atom Egoyan’s Ararat
  2. pp. 87-106
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  1. Part II: Coloniality and Postcoloniality
  2. p. 107
  1. 5. Massacre and the Movies: Soldier Blue and the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864
  2. pp. 109-121
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  1. 6. The Other in Genocide: Responsibility and Benevolence in Rabbit-Proof Fence
  2. pp. 122-132
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  1. 7. Genres of “Yet An Other Genocide” : Cinematic Representations of Rwanda
  2. pp. 133-154
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  1. Part III: Visual Documentation andGenocide
  2. p. 155
  1. 8. The Specter of Genocide in Errol Morris’s The Fog of War
  2. pp. 157-169
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  1. 9. GIs Documenting Genocide: Amateur Films of World War II Concentration Camps
  2. pp. 170-186
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  1. 10. Through the Open Society Archives to The Portraitist: Film’s Impulse toward Death and Witness
  2. pp. 187-202
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  1. Part IV: Interviews
  2. p. 203
  1. 11. Greg Barker, Director of Ghosts of Rwanda (2004)
  2. pp. 205-216
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  1. 12. Nick Hughes, Director of 100 Days (2001)
  2. pp. 217-227
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  1. 13. Irek Dobrowolski, Director of T,he Portraitist (2005)
  2. pp. 228-236
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  1. Filmography
  2. pp. 237-240
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 241-254
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 255-258
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 259-266
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