In this Book

Romances of the White Man's Burden
summary
“Take up the white man’s burden!” So wrote the English writer Rudyard Kipling in 1899, in a poem aimed at Americans at a time when colonial ambitions were particularly high. The poem proved especially popular among white southern men, who saw in its vision of America’s imperial future an image that appeared to reflect and even redeem the South’s plantation past. Romances of the White Man’s Burden takes on works in American literature in which the proverbial “old plantation” is made to seem not a relic but a harbinger, a sign that the South had arrived at a multiracial modernity and harmony before the rest of the United States. Focusing on writers such as Joel Chandler Harris, Thomas Nelson Page, Henry W. Grady, Thomas Dixon, and William Faulkner, Jeremy Wells reveals their shared fixation on the figure of the white southern man as specially burdened by history. Each of these writers, in his own way, presented the plantation South as an emblem, not an aberration, of America.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Table of Contents
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: White Southern Men and the Burden of Empire
  2. pp. 1-31
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Uncle Remus's Empire
  2. pp. 33-71
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. "The Old South under New Conditions": Henry W. Grady, Thomas Nelson Page, and New Southern Manhood
  2. pp. 73-110
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Manifest Destinies, Invisible Empires: Thomas Dixon's Imperial Fantasies
  2. pp. 111-142
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. "White Babies . . . Struggling": William Faulkner and the White Man's Burden
  2. pp. 143-171
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Conclusion: Plantation Nationhood and the Myth of Southern Otherness
  2. pp. 173-184
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 185-209
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 211-228
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 229-238
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.