Cover

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Front Matter

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Contents

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p. v

Illustrations

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p. vi

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Introduction to the Third Edition

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pp. vii-x

When the first edition of this book was published in 1985, housing and community development policy in the United States had just passed through a period of turmoil and change. The decade of the 1970s began with a commitment to greatly increase the federal government’s role in ensuring that...

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1. Power, Ideology, and Public Policy

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pp. 1-14

The study of policy and the study of power are closely related. Power is usually operationally defined in terms of policy outcomes—that is, as the ability of a political actor to influence the behavior of others in such a way as to gain a preferred outcome. Students of power and of policymaking...

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2. The Ideological Framework for Housing Policy

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pp. 15-58

In order to establish an overarching ideological framework for the examination of housing policy, this chapter will proceed from the more general ideological context to the more specific frameworks affecting housing policy. Since this is a work concerning public policy, rather than political philosophy, the ideas...

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3. Housing and Human Needs

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pp. 59-85

In chapters 1 and 2, the political and ideological frameworks within which housing policy is created have been described. This chapter addresses the fundamental question of why housing is important to human existence. Public policy is not always directed toward meeting fundamental human needs; it may address symbolic...

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4. Federal Housing Assistance from the Depression to the Moratorium:1934–1973

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pp. 87-138

In this and the following chapter, the development of housing policies in the social welfare policy context will be examined. This history must be explored at three levels of generality. First, housing policy must be placed in the context of the broad shifts in political climate that have occurred since the 1930s. It was...

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5. New Directions in Housing Assistance:1973–1980

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pp. 139-163

In September 1973, HUD completed its report on housing programs and strategies. Under the title Housing in the Seventies, it included what had been promised, a comprehensive review of federal involvement in housing, particularly housing for the poor. Though couched in the technical language...

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6. The Federal Role in Community Development

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pp. 165-222

In this chapter, the major federal initiatives in community development between 1945 and 1980 will be explored, with particular attention to the close relationship between these efforts and federal housing policy. In chapter 2, it was argued that housing programs have often been viewed within the frame of reference...

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7. Retrenchment and Recovery: Reagan and George H. W. Bush

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pp. 223-251

The 1980 election, in which Ronald Reagan defeated the incumbent president, Jimmy Carter, brought to power the most ideologically conservative administration since the 1920s. This set the stage for a major shift in expenditures and in philosophy at the federal level, and housing programs could hardly avoid the effects...

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8. Stagnation and Progress: The Clinton Era

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pp. 253-282

Compared to the 1980s, the 1990s began more auspiciously for the federal effort to address the housing needs of low and moderate income families and to revitalize communities. In 1990, a moderate Republican administration had worked with a Democratic Congress to produce a bold redesign of the federal housing...

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9. Housing in the Twenty-first Century

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pp. 283-305

The long-term result of the contested election of 2000 was another significant rightward shift in American politics, but the will of the voters was decidedly murky at the time, given the extreme closeness of the vote. The most important effect of the Electoral College system for electing presidents is to divide the national...

References

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pp. 301-331

Index

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pp. 333-339