Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

The editors are particularly pleased to present this volume of the History of Medieval Canon Law because no other book in any language covers the rich history of canon law in Eastern Christianity. As will become clear to the reader, from the perspective of the contemporary world canon law in the East presents linguistic difficulties and ironies. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-xvi

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1. The Formation of Ecclesiastical Law in the Early Church

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pp. 1-23

Understanding the development of ecclesiastical law in the Eastern empire prior to the Council of Nicaea (325) involves several assumptions.1 First is the conviction that eastern canon law can be profitably differentiated from its counterpart in the West. Especially for this early period, however, there is little material to prevent one from doing precisely that, because...

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2. Sources of the Greek Canon Law to the Quinisext Council (691/2): Councils and Church Fathers

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pp. 24-114

It is usual to organize the canonical material of Byzantine canon law into four groups: (1) Canons of the Apostles; (2) Canons of ecumenical synods; (3) Canons of local synods; (4) Canons of the Fathers. This organization is found in most of the editions available today.1 It was first found in canon 1 of the Seventh Ecumenical Council (787), and it has been generally followed in the Orthodox Church in the second millennium. ...

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3. Byzantine Canon Law to 1100

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pp. 115-169

During the fourth century, many councils, most of them local, convened and enacted provisions for the organization and the functioning the legal life of the Church. In connection with these provisions (the ‘canons’, as they were called), there soon appeared collections that came about solely through private initiative. These collections initially served local...

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4. Byzantine Canon Law from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Centuries

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pp. 170-214

From the twelfth to the fifteenth century, the activity of the patriarchal synod of Constantinople, as the highest organ of the Eastern Church, continued, mainly in the form of the ‘Endemousa Synod’ (see the previous chapter for details). This gathering, however, gradually shed its character as an ‘accidental’ meeting of bishops and became rather a formal...

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5. Sources of Canon Law in the Eastern Churches

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pp. 215-342

In the Christian East the ecclesiastical landscape was patterned after geographical units that followed the territorial lines of the Roman Empire, namely the boundaries of the patriarchates of Alexandria, Antioch, Constantinople, and Jerusalem. Christian communities also extended outside the boundaries of the empire into Persia, Armenia, Georgia, and Ethiopia. ...

Index of Councils and Synods

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pp. 343-344

General Index

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pp. 345-356