Cover

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Title page, Copyright Page, Dedication Page

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Out of the early third-century, during a time of persecution of Christians in North Africa, came an account of joyful suffering and victorious martyrdom, The Passion of Perpetua and Felicitas. Included in this document were two prison diaries, written by a catechumen Perpetua and her teacher Saturus, ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xviii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

In the late second and early third centuries, persecution against Christians erupted throughout the Roman Empire1 as a result of either an imperial edict or localized legislation and pogroms.2 The persecution in Carthage led to the arrest of several young catechumens and their teacher. ...

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1. Montanism

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pp. 9-43

Montanism received its name from its founder, Montanus, but not until the fourth century, when Cyril of Jerusalem (c. 315–86) used the term Montanists...

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2. Authorship of the Passion

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pp. 44-57

Before examining the text of the Passion, it is necessary to determine its authorship. The document consists of three separate parts, which are the two martyrs’ diaries and the editorial framework. Therefore, two problems must be investigated: the authenticity of the diaries and the identity of the unnamed editor. ...

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3. Examination of the Passion

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pp. 58-96

After the exploration of the authorship of the Passion, the next step is the examination of the document for Montanist viewpoints, which are judged by criteria established in chapter one. The Passion consists of four sections: a preface; Perpetua’s narrative, including four visions; Saturus’ vision; and the account of the martyrdom. ...

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4. The Passion in Literary/Historical Context

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pp. 97-126

Throughout The Passion of Perpetua and Felicitas, in the preface, the diaries, the visions, and the account of the martyrdom, signs of Montanism can be observed. Yet, not all readers perceived the Montanist beliefs of the authors, especially of Perpetua and Saturus. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 127-132

Many unique features set the Passion apart from other acts of martyrdom from the patristic period. The autobiographical sections written by Perpetua and Saturus and preserved along with the eyewitness account of the editor were original with the Passion and provide keen insights into the thoughts and emotions of early martyrs. …

Notes

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pp. 133-184

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 185-206

Index of Modern Authors

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pp. 207-208

Subject Index

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pp. 209-212