In this Book

Beyond Bondage
summary
David Barry Gaspar and Darlene Clark Hine's Beyond Bondage outlines the restricted spheres within which free women of color, by virtue of gender and racial restrictions, were forced to carve out their existences. Although their freedom, represented by the acquisition of property, respectability, and opportunity, always remained precarious, the collection supports the surprising conclusion that women of color often sought and obtained these advantages more successfully than their male counterparts.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. I. Achieving and Preserving Freedom
  2. p. 1
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  1. 1. Maroon Women in Colonial Spanish America: Case Studies in the Circum-Caribbean from the Sixteenth through the Eighteenth Centuries
  2. pp. 3-18
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  1. 2. Of Life and Freedom at the (Tropical) Hearth: El Cobre, Cuba, 1709–73
  2. pp. 19-36
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  1. 3. In the Shadow of the Plantation: Women of Color and the Libres de fait of Martinique and Guadeloupe, 1685–1848
  2. pp. 37-59
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  1. 4. “To Be Free Is Very Sweet”: The Manumission of Female Slaves in Antigua, 1817–26
  2. pp. 60-81
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  1. 5. “Do Thou in Gentle Phibia Smile”: Scenes from an Interracial Marriage, Jamaica, 1754–86
  2. pp. 82-105
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  1. 6. The Fragile Nature of Freedom: Free Women of Color in the U.S. South
  2. pp. 106-124
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  1. II. Making a Life in Freedom
  2. p. 125
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  1. 7. Out of Bounds: Emancipated and Enslaved Women in Antebellum America
  2. pp. 127-144
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  1. 8. Free Black and Colored Women in Early-Nineteenth-Century Paramaribo, Suriname
  2. pp. 145-168
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  1. 9. Ana Paulinha de Queirós, Joaquinada Costa, and Their Neighbors: Free Women of Color as Household Heads in Rural Bahia (Brazil), 1835
  2. pp. 169-201
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  1. 10. Libertas Citadinas: Free Women of Color in San Juan, Puerto Rico
  2. pp. 202-218
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  1. 11. Landlords, Shopkeepers, Farmers, and Slave-Owners: Free Black Female Property-Holders in Colonial New Orleans
  2. pp. 219-236
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  1. 12. Free Women of Color in Central Brazil, 1779–1832
  2. pp. 237-270
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  1. 13. Henriette Delille, Free Women of Color, and Catholicism in Antebellum New Orleans, 1727–1852
  2. pp. 271-285
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  1. 14. Religious Women of Color in Seventeenth-Century Lima: Estefania de San Ioseph and Ursula de Jesu Christo
  2. pp. 286-316
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  1. Index
  2. p. 317
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 327-329
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  1. Publication Information
  2. p. 330
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