Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Contents

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Foreword

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pp. ix-x

Of all the contradictions inherent in the incarceration of the Japanese American population of the West Coast during World War II, perhaps none is so striking as the program that took four thousand of the imprisoned people of college age, as Allan W. Austin puts it, “from concentration...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Although people too numerous to list have provided help as this project has developed, I must first and foremost extend my gratitude to Roger Daniels, who has provided invaluable guidance and support from the initial stages of this book through its final revisions. Professor Daniels, as both an...

Abbreviations

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p. xiii

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Introduction: "Ambassadors of Goodwill"

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pp. 1-8

A Japanese American college student incarcerated at the Tanforan camp in 1942 discovered that by climbing a hill he could see a familiar sign that he had driven past countless times on his way to school. From his new vantage point, however, he remembered that it now “‘seemed as though...

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1. Creating the National Japanese American Student Relocation Council

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pp. 9-36

Yamaguchi’s poignant notice revealed the despair that Nikkei students felt as exile loomed. The despair moved different people in different ways, however. Some Nikkei dropped out immediately after Pearl Harbor. Yamaguchi and others temporarily remained in school but viewed exile and...

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2. Living in Hope and Working on Faith, Summer 1942

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pp. 37-61

Commencement exercises at the Santa Anita Assembly Center in June 1942 highlighted the incongruent circumstances of the incarcerated students. The ceremony, held in a concentration camp because of the presumed disloyalty of the inmates, began with the national anthem. More than...

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3. In "Free America," Fall 1942-Summer 1943

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pp. 62-96

“I am feeling like Cinderella,” Chiya Veronica Asado wrote from Western College in Oxford, Ohio, “and I am hoping that this shall not be a spirit that will wear off in time.” Aided by a $295 scholarship from the Presbyterian Church and a job at Western, she had come to Ohio in...

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4. Change and New Challenges in a World at War, Fall 1943-Summer 1944

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pp. 97-128

“It is very good,” Mary Murata wrote Trudy King, “to be out again and enjoy the freedom of walking the streets, riding vehicles, and so many other things which we missed so long.” Blocked from resettlement during 1942–43 by school quotas, Murata resettled to St. Mary’s School of...

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5. Closing Down and Saying Sayonara, 1944-46

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pp. 129-159

Nobuko Emoto joyfully wrote a supportive minister in June 1944 that “God must have heard my prayer.” Her parents had finally allowed her to leave the Gila River concentration camp for Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania and “now there [was] nothing to do for [her] freedom but wait...

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Conclusion: Memory and the Meaning of Student Resettlement

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pp. 161-172

While positive memories of the council justifiably remain today, especially among the students it helped, a critical appraisal of the council and its program is necessary. The council negotiated a complex and racist wartime environment to help a group that many Americans considered...

Appendix 1. Attendees at May 29, 1942 Meeting in Chicago

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pp. 173-174

Appendix 2. Attendees at September 29, 1943, Meeting in New York City

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pp. 175-176

Notes

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pp. 177-222

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 223-229

Index

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pp. 230-237