Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

It is difficult to claim ownership of the ideas expressed on the following pages. All research is a curious mix of old and new, original and unoriginal ideas, and mine is no different. My ideas about what democracy is and ought to be and what role the press and the law play in the realization of democracy are indebted to...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

This book examines the complex relationship between corporations and the public sphere. While most critiques of corporate ownership focus on the product, this book attempts to uncover how the corporate form has changed the way we think and talk about democracy. It argues that corporations have altered the culture of democracy...

Part 1: The Corporation and Democracy

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1. The Rise of Corporate Rationalization

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pp. 15-26

The examination of corporate influence on public life in the United States is not lacking in literature. From Alexis de Tocqueville through the Progressive movement to today’s corporate critics, the corporate form—or what Tocqueville called the “manufacturing...

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2. Corporate Rationalization and Discourse Democracy: Seeking Alternatives

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pp. 27-48

The history of corporate liberalism helps us understand the dominant political landscape that we live in today, but it does not explain how it became dominant and how citizens might critique that form. In an attempt to provide a framework for addressing...

Part 2: Corporate Rationalization and Democratic Institutions

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3. Professionalization of the Press and Law: Routinization and Management

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pp. 51-81

In 1922, Walter Lippmann clearly put forward the Progressive view: “[E]very complicated community has sought the assistance of special men, of augurs, priests, elders. Our own democracy, based though it was on a theory of universal competence...

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4. Defining a Professional Mission: The Law and the Question of Public Representation

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pp. 82-100

Vanessa Leggett is an odd poster child for American journalism’s professionalization movement, but in 2001 and 2002 she became just that. A freelance book author with only one published article to her credit, no book contract, and no representation from...

Part 3: The First Amendment and Public Life

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5. Corporate Ownership and the Press: Collapsing Distinctions

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pp. 103-122

The uneasy relationship between corporations and the press reflects the problems corporations present for American democracy. Corporations have changed how journalism is done and where it focuses its attention. Journalists have long railed against corporate ownership—if not ownership in general—yet they continue to work...

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6. Public Television, Parks, Parades, and Rest Areas: Managing the Property of Public Life

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pp. 123-143

One of the ways that corporate rationalization dominates public life is by changing how citizens interact with space. In recent years, public life has increasingly been evaluated in corporate terms—as a form of property to be managed efficiently. Viewing the world through the lens of property rights (referred to as the Lochner...

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7. Resisting Corporate Rationalization: Toward a Discourse Theory of the First Amendment

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pp. 144-160

As this book is being written, there are almost daily news reports of corporate malfeasance in the United States. Enron, Worldcom, Arthur Anderson, and others have become synonymous with corporate greed and corruption. Corporations such as these have come to dominate our public discussions and have complicated American...

Notes

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pp. 161-194

Index

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pp. 195-216