Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

I would like to thank Martine Gantrel of Smith College and Michel Raimond of the Sorbonne, whose inspiring teaching sparked in me long ago a deep and lasting interest in Proust. Peter Brooks, who directed my doctoral dissertation on Proust at Yale University, has remained a critical...

A Note on Quotations

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p. xi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

“Life is too short and Proust is too long”:1 Anatole France’s wry remark has long made the rounds as a humorous summing-up, and an implicit casting-off, of one of the most important and most difficult literary...

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1. Forthcoming: Announcing the Recherche

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pp. 11-30

Like most novels published in France at the beginning of the twentieth century, À la recherche du temps perdu was the object of a strategic publicity campaign designed to hook the interest of readers even before the...

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2. The Dream of Simultaneous Publication

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pp. 31-52

When Proust proposed his manuscript to various publishers in the fall of 1912, it was without committing to a published form for the work other than the very one in which he delivered it: Le Temps perdu was an enormous stack of pages, an indivisible block. He had...

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3. Organicism Gone Awry

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pp. 53-82

When Jacques Normand, in his reader’s report for Eugène Fasquelle in 1912, wrote of Proust’s meandering manuscript that “écrire vingt volumes est aussi normal que de s’arrêter à un ou à deux” (writing twenty volumes would be just as normal as stopping at one or...

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4. Grasset's Revenge

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pp. 83-114

Some nine months before his death, Proust announced to his publisher Gaston Gallimard that the Recherche had scarcely begun. “J’ai tant de livres à vous offrir qui, si je meurs avant,” he wrote in February...

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Epilogue

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pp. 115-118

Proust’s letters to Gallimard contain frequent complaints about delays in the publication of his books, despite the fact that his perpetual revisions were themselves the cause of more than a few delays. In November...

Notes

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pp. 119-130

Works Cited

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pp. 131-136

Index

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pp. 137-140