Front Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Table of Contents

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

As a form of government, democracy enjoys unparalleled prestige at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The most prosperous nations in the world were democracies. Moreover, democracy’s “third wave” had generated an unprecedented number of new republics in southern and eastern...

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1. International Perspectives on Democracy in the Twenty-first Century

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pp. 1-10

This volume touches some truly profound and fundamental questions about the future of democratic governance in the upcoming century. One subset of questions derives from matters that cloud the prospects for continued democratization (i.e., Will a fourth wave of democratization...

Part I. Democratization on the Frontiers of the Third Wave

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2. Democratization in the Twenty-first Century: The Prospects for the Global Diffusion of Democracy

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pp. 13-41

One of the most important developments of the late twentieth century was the emergence of democratic forms of government throughout most of the world. Indeed, the last quarter of the century has been heralded as the age of democracy, and the diffusion of these democracies...

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3. Is Democracy Contagious? Diffusion and the Dynamics of Regime Transition

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pp. 42-62

Transitions to democracy tend to cluster both temporally and spatially, leading many to employ a wave metaphor in describing democratization. Widespread use of the wave metaphor implies the intriguing possibility that a democratic transition in one country increases the...

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4. A Fourth Wave? The Role of International Actors in Democratization

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pp. 63-87

The “third wave” of democratization (Huntington 1991) may have begun to crest in the mid 1990s, but it certainly has not ebbed. In 1995, Freedom House rated the world’s countries as 40 percent free, 32 percent partly free, and 28 percent not free on political and civil liberties...

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5. "Western Institutions" and "Universal Values": Barriers to the Adoption of Democracy

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pp. 88-111

To virtually all Americans and many Europeans, the failure of other societies to embrace liberal democratic political institutions is inexplicable. Democracy is not only self-evidently desirable, for many it is the natural or “default” political arrangement, its absence signaling some kind...

II. Globalization and Democracy

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6. Issues, Information Flows, and Cognitive Capacities: Democratic Citizenship in a Global Era

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pp. 115-133

Globalization’s presence and importance grow daily. Proponents point to concrete manifestations such as improved standards of living, increasingly uniform standards of justice, and technological breakthroughs that no country alone could have achieved. By their accounts, people...

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7. Globaliztion, the Decline of Civic Commitments, and the Future of Democracy

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pp. 134-157

According to a substantial number of people, the nation-state is under assault from both external and internal pressures. The kinds of changes that have occurred in the global political economy in the last two decades are said to threaten the centrality of the nation-state as the primary...

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8. Globalization, Sovereignty, and Democracy: The Role of International Organizations in a Globalizing World

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pp. 158-182

An important part of the globalization process has been the internationalization of political authority. International organizations are an attempt to respond to, as well as to further, the development of transnational relationships, private and public. Democracies have been the most...

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9. Democracy and Markets in the Twenty-first Century: An Agenda

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pp. 183-220

The direction of global economic change in this century is relatively clear. State-owned enterprises are being privatized and new capital markets are emerging in many countries. These and existing markets are becoming increasingly liberalized and interconnected. A truly global financial...

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10. Economic Globalization and Democracy

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pp. 221-248

Advocates of economic globalization claim that the liberalization of markets and expansion of global trade are the best way to foster robust economic growth, and that the resulting rise in national income reduces poverty. Critics claim that economic globalization increases poverty and inequality...

Contributors

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pp. 249-253

Index

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pp. 255-264

Back Cover

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