In this Book

summary
A. Philip Randolph's career as a trade unionist and civil rights activist fundamentally shaped the course of black protest in the mid-twentieth century. Standing alongside W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and others at the center of the cultural renaissance and political radicalism that shaped communities such as Harlem in the 1920s and into the 1930s, Randolph fashioned an understanding of social justice that reflected a deep awareness of how race complicated class concerns, especially among black laborers. Examining Randolph's work in lobbying for the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, threatening to lead a march on Washington in 1941, and establishing the Fair Employment Practice Committee, Cornelius L. Bynum shows that Randolph's push for African American equality took place within a broader progressive program of industrial reform. Bynum interweaves biographical information with details on how Randolph gradually shifted his thinking about race and class, full citizenship rights, industrial organization, trade unionism, and civil rights protest throughout his activist career.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Table of Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. ix-xix
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  1. Part 1. Building Black Identity at the Turn of the Century
  2. p. 1
  1. 1. A. Philip Randolph, Racial Identity, and Family Relations: Tracing the Development of a Racial Self-Concept
  2. pp. 3-23
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  1. 2. Religious Faith and Black Empowerment: The AME Church and Randolph's Racial Identity and View of Social Justice
  2. pp. 24-44
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  1. Part 2. Contructing Class Consciousness in the Jazz Age
  2. p. 45
  1. 3. Black Radicalism in Harlem: Randolph's Racial and Political Consciousness
  2. pp. 47-62
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  1. 4. Crossing the Color Line: Randolph's Transition from Race to Class Consciousness
  2. pp. 63-82
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  1. Part 3. The Rise of the New Crowd Negroes
  2. p. 83
  1. 5. A New Crowd, A New Negro: The Messenger and New Negro Ideology in the 1920s
  2. pp. 85-100
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  1. 6. Black and White Unite: Randolph and the Divide between Class Theory and the Race Problem
  2. pp. 101-116
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  1. Part 4. Blending Race and Class
  2. p. 117
  1. 7. Ridin' the Rails: Randolph and the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters' Struggle for Union Recognition
  2. pp. 119-135
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  1. 8. Where Class Consciousness Falls Short: Randolph and the Brotherhood's Standing in the House of Labor
  2. pp. 136-156
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  1. 9. Marching Toward Fair Employment: Randolph, the Race/Class Connection, and the March on Washington Movement
  2. pp. 157-184
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  1. Epilogue: A. Philip Randolph's Reconciliation of Race and Class in African American Protest Politics
  2. pp. 185-200
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  1. [Image Plates]
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 201-226
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 227-236
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 237-244
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  1. Further reading, About the Author, Publication Information
  2. p. 245
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780252090066
Related ISBN
9780252035753
MARC Record
OCLC
702844583
Pages
272
Launched on MUSE
2013-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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