In this Book

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In this manuscript, Hicks examines the lives and experiences of working-class black women in early twentieth-century New York. By placing the hopes, concerns, and decisions of these women at the center of an urban narrative, Hicks explores average women's expectations of themselves and their communities as well as their families' and communities' expectations of them. She presents a range of women's ideas about and responses to respectability, domesticity, safety, and sexual desire in the urban North, thereby revealing the complexity of black women's experiences from a vantage point different from that provided by uplift studies. The manuscript focuses on three major themes: urban reform and justice, gender and the criminal justice system, and the dynamics of black families. These themes work to articulate a more full and heretofore-neglected understanding of black working-class women, their relationships with their families, and their interactions with the social welfare and criminal justice systems.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vi-vii
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  1. illustrations
  2. p. ix
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. INTRODUCTION: Talk with You Like a Woman
  2. pp. 1-19
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  1. I: African American Urban Life and the Multiple Meanings of Protection in the City
  2. p. 21
  1. CHAPTER 1. To Live a Fuller and Freer Life: Black Women Migrants’ Expectations and New York’s Urban Realities, 1890–1927
  2. pp. 23-52
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  1. CHAPTER 2. The Only One That Would Be Interested in Me: Police Brutality, Black Women’s Protection, and the New York Race Riot of 1900
  2. pp. 53-90
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  1. CHAPTER 3. I Want to Save These Girls: Single Black Women and Their Protectors, 1895–1911
  2. pp. 91-121
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  1. II: Urban Reform and Criminal Justice
  2. p. 123
  1. CHAPTER 4. Colored Women of Hard and Vicious Character: Respectability, Domesticity, and Crime, 1893–1933
  2. pp. 125-158
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  1. CHAPTER 5. Tragedy of the Colored Girl in Court: The National Urban League and New York’s Women’s Court, 1911–1931
  2. pp. 159-181
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  1. CHAPTER 6. In Danger of Becoming Morally Depraved: Single Black Women, Working-Class Black Families, and New York State’s Wayward Minor Laws, 1917–1928
  2. pp. 182-203
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  1. CHAPTER 7. A Rather Bright and Good-Looking Colored Girl: Black Women’s Sexuality, “Harmful Intimacy,” and Attempts to Regulate Desire, 1917–1928
  2. pp. 204-233
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  1. III: Rehabilitation, Respectability, and Race
  2. p. 235
  1. CHAPTER 8. I Don’t Live on My Sister, I Living of Myself: Parole, Gender, and Black Families, 1905–1935
  2. pp. 237-252
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  1. CHAPTER 9. She Would Be Better off in the South: Sending Women on Parole to Their Southern Kin, 1920–1935
  2. pp. 253-269
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  1. CONCLUSION: Thank God I Am Independent One More Time
  2. pp. 271-277
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 279-334
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 335-354
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 355-372
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469603759
Related ISBN
9780807834244
MARC Record
OCLC
698110362
Pages
392
Launched on MUSE
2013-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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