In this Book

Creating Consumers
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
Home economics emerged at the turn of the twentieth century as a movement to train women to be more efficient household managers. At the same moment, American families began to consume many more goods and services than they produced. To guide women in this transition, professional home economists had two major goals: to teach women to assume their new roles as modern consumers and to communicate homemakers' needs to manufacturers and political leaders. Carolyn M. Goldstein charts the development of the profession from its origins as an educational movement to its identity as a source of consumer expertise in the interwar period to its virtual disappearance by the 1970s.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-20
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Envisioning the Rational Consumer, 1900–1920
  2. pp. 21-61
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Creating a Science of Consumption at the Bureau of Home Economics, 1920–1940
  2. pp. 62-97
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Reforming the Marketplace at the Bureau of Home Economics, 1923–1940
  2. pp. 98-135
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Selling Home Economics: The Professional Ideals of Businesswomen, 1920–1940
  2. pp. 136-173
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Product Testing, Development, and Promotion: Corporate Investment in Home Economics, 1920–1940
  2. pp. 174-207
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. From Service to Sales: Utility Home Service Departments, 1920–1940
  2. pp. 208-241
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Mediation Marginalized: Home Economics in Government and Business, 1940–1970
  2. pp. 242-281
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Identity Crisis and Confusion: Home Economics and Social Change, 1950–1975
  2. pp. 282-295
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Epilogue
  2. pp. 296-302
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 303-362
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 363-390
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 391-412
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.