In this Book

Working Knowledge
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summary
Skilled workers of the early nineteenth century enjoyed a degree of professional independence because workplace knowledge and technical skill were their property, or at least their attribute. In most sectors of today's economy, however, it is a foundational and widely accepted truth that businesses retain legal ownership of employee-generated intellectual property.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-18
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  1. PART I: WORKPLACE KNOWLEDGE AS A PERSONAL ATTRIBUTE, 1800–1860
  2. pp. 19-22
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  1. 1. Stealing in the Dark the Improvements of Others
  2. pp. 23-58
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  1. 2. The Genius Which Conceived and the Toil Which Compiled the Book
  2. pp. 59-74
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  1. PART II: FREE LABOR, FREE ENTERPRISE, AND THE FREEDOM TO CONTRACT OVER INNOVATION, 1860–1895
  2. pp. 75-86
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  1. 3. If These Mill Owners Desire to Cripple a Man’s Enterprise and His Energy and Intelligence, They Must Contract to That Effect
  2. pp. 87-107
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  1. 4. An Ingenious Man Enabled by Contract
  2. pp. 108-136
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  1. 5. They Claim to Own Him, Body and Soul
  2. pp. 137-172
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  1. PART III: WORKPLACE KNOWLEDGE AS CORPORATE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, 1895–1930
  2. pp. 173-176
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  1. 6. Corporate Management of Science and Scientific Management of Corporations
  2. pp. 177-210
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  1. 7. The Corporation’s Money Paid for the Painting; Its Artist Colored It; Its President Designed It
  2. pp. 211-239
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  1. CONCLUSION. Attribution, Authenticity, and the Corporate Production of Technology and Culture
  2. pp. 240-256
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 257-310
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 311-338
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 339-360
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