Frontmatter

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Title Page

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p. iii

Contents

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p. vii

Illustrations

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p. viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

Writing a book involves many hours spent alone in an archive or at a computer. But it is hardly done in isolation. This book has benefited immensely from the advice, feedback, assistance, and support of many individuals and organizations. It began at Harvard University, where my readers guided me through the process of turning an idea into a...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-17

When Americans think of the Civil War, few images come to mind more often than those from the epic film Gone with the Wind. We remember Scarlett O’Hara’s early fright and growing fortitude as she loses and regains her estate. We remember Rhett Butler’s dry cynicism about his compatriots’ lust for war. And we remember, with incredulity...

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1. Dwellers beside the Sea: Colleges at War

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pp. 19-51

When Sallie Love received her college diploma, she may well have heaved a sigh of relief. Few knew the difficulties of attending college in wartime better than she. When the Civil War broke out, the Love, Mississippi, native was attending the State Female College in Memphis, Tennessee. Upon the surrender of Tennessee’s Fort Donelson to Northern...

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2. The Curriculum: Teaching the Arts of Peace and War

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pp. 52-91

On September 30, 1859, the lawyer and failed senatorial candidate Abraham Lincoln spoke to the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society at its annual fair in Milwaukee. Although conceding that he was “in no sort a farmer” himself, Lincoln pointed to what he saw as some of the most important issues of the day relating to agriculture. ...

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3. Admissions: Race, Class, Gender

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pp. 92-127

In October 1876 South Carolina’s governor received a letter from Grandison Harris, a justice of the peace in Augusta, Georgia. Harris wished to send his son to study law at the University of South Carolina. He wrote to the governor, who chaired the board of trustees, to inquire about admissions procedures and tuition fees. ...

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4. Admissions: Geography, Service, Morality

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pp. 128-152

William H. Lynch, a lieutenant in the Thirty-second Missouri Volunteer Infantry (USA), returned to his home state in August 1865. But instead of going to his hometown of Houston, he headed one hundred miles north to Columbia. There he enrolled at the University of Missouri. He spent the next year studying Greek, Latin, mathematics...

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5. College, Community, and Nation

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pp. 153-186

In a Pennsylvania hall in 1876, adults leafed through examination papers by Lincoln University students. But they were not professors at the African American university. They were not even on the Chester County campus. Nearby, others watched children engaged in a kindergarten lesson. But they were neither teachers nor parents. They were not even in...

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Conclusion

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pp. 187-195

When the Civil War began, higher education in America comprised chiefl y small colleges that taught students an abstract curriculum rooted in the classical languages and mathematics. In the North they attracted students from a broad range of social classes who wished to become ministers, doctors, lawyers, or teachers. In the South they enrolled...

Notes and Bibliography

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pp. 197-258

Index

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pp. 259-273