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T. Thomas Fortune, the Afro-American Agitator
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Born into slavery, T. Thomas Fortune was known as the dean of African American journalism by the time of his death in the early twentieth century. The editorship of three prominent black newspapers--the New York Globe, New York Freeman, and New York Age--provided Fortune with a platform to speak against racism and injustice.

For nearly five decades his was one of the most powerful voices in the press. Contemporaries such as Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington considered him an equal, if not a superior, in social and political thought. Today's histories often pass over his writings, in part because they are so voluminous and have rarely been reprinted. Shawn Leigh Alexander's anthology will go a long way toward rectifying that situation, demonstrating the breadth of Fortune's contribution to black political thought at a key period in American history.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. T. Thomas Fortune the Afro-American Agitator: A Collection of Writings, 1880–1928
  2. pp. xi-xxxviii
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  1. Brief Chronology of T. Thomas Fortune’s Life
  2. pp. xxxix-xli
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  1. Prescript
  2. pp. xlii-xliii
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  1. Part 1. Politics, Economics, and Education
  2. p. 1
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  1. 1. Who Will Own the Soil of the South in the Future
  2. pp. 3-5
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  1. 2. Status of the Race
  2. pp. 6-14
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  1. 3. The Civil Rights Decision
  2. pp. 15-17
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  1. 4. Between Two Fires
  2. pp. 18-23
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  1. 5. A New Party/But It Will Be!
  2. pp. 24-26
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  1. 6. The Negro in Politics
  2. pp. 27-73
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  1. 7. Negrowump
  2. pp. 74-84
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  1. 8. The Kind of Education the Afro-American Most Needs
  2. pp. 85-91
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  1. 9. The Negro’s Place in American Life at the Present Day
  2. pp. 92-103
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  1. 10. The Voteless Citizen
  2. pp. 104-110
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  1. Part 2. Civil Rights and Race Leadership
  2. p. 113
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  1. 11. The Virtue Of Agitation
  2. pp. 115-117
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  1. 12. Civil Rights and Social Privileges
  2. pp. 118-133
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  1. 13. Afro-American League Convention Speech
  2. pp. 134-152
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  1. 14. Are We Brave Men or Cowards?
  2. pp. 153-157
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  1. 15. Mob Law in the South
  2. pp. 158-164
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  1. 16. Immorality of Southern Suffrage Legislation
  2. pp. 165-170
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  1. 17. False Theory of Education Cause of Race Demoralization
  2. pp. 171-179
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  1. 18. Failure of the Afro-American People to Organize
  2. pp. 180-183
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  1. 19. The Breath of Agitation Is Life
  2. pp. 184-191
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  1. 20. The Quick and the Dead
  2. pp. 192-200
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  1. 21. A Man without a Country
  2. pp. 201-202
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  1. 22. Segregation and Neighborhood Agreements
  2. pp. 203-206
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  1. Part 3. Race and the Color Line
  2. p. 207
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  1. 23. John Brown and Nat. Turner
  2. pp. 209-211
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  1. 24. The Color Line
  2. pp. 212-214
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  1. 25. The Afro-American
  2. pp. 215-220
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  1. 26. Whose Problem Is This?
  2. pp. 221-229
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  1. 27. The Latest Color Line
  2. pp. 230-236
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  1. 28. Race Absorption
  2. pp. 237-247
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  1. 29. Who Are We? Afro-Americans, Colored People or Negroes?
  2. pp. 248-252
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  1. 30. We Must Make Literature to Make Public Opinion
  2. pp. 253-254
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  1. 31. Separate the Douglass and Lincoln Birthdays
  2. pp. 255-256
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  1. Part 4. Africa, Emigration, and Colonialism
  2. p. 257
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  1. 32. The World in Africa
  2. pp. 259-260
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  1. 33. An African Empire
  2. pp. 261-263
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  1. 34. Will the Afro-American Return to Africa?
  2. pp. 264-270
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  1. 35. The Nationalization of Africa
  2. pp. 271-280
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  1. Postscript
  2. pp. 281-282
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  1. Selected Bibliography of Fortune’s Writings
  2. pp. 283-286
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  1. Selected Bibliography for Further Reading
  2. pp. 287-290
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 291-294
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  1. About the Author, Further Reading
  2. p. 295
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