Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

title page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

The immediate opportunity and impulse for writing this book come from the spectacular restoration of the Montpelier mansion to its appearance as it was during the years of the Madisons’ retirement there, 1817–36. In the hands of several owners from the time of Dolley Madison’s sale of Montpelier in 1844 ...

read more

1. Return to “Books and Farm, to Tranquility and Independence”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-47

James Madison, with Dolley at his side, left Washington for the last time on April 17, 1817. He was sixty-six; she was forty-nine, and they had been married twenty-three years. Their retirement began when, with all their trunks of belongings, they stepped on board an early version of a steamboat docked at Potomac Wharf. ...

read more

2. Continuing Public Involvement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 48-98

Whitcomb further observed that Madison took many newspapers and, much more than Jefferson, remained well informed on current issues. In fact, from the moment he left Washington, James Madison remained an active elder statesman, fully abreast of public affairs and in close touch with the nation’s political leaders. Dolley maintained the same interest. ...

read more

3. “I May Be Thought to Have Outlived Myself”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-145

Increasingly as the twenty years in retirement stretched out, however, attention to public affairs and even to cherished educational projects gave way to the perennial concerns of old age: health, reminiscence, and refl ection at the loss of lifelong associates. To an earnest plea in 1834 that he speak out against Jackson’s war on the Bank of the United States, ...

read more

4. “The Last of the Great Lights of the Revolution Has Sunk Below the Horizon”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-176

Through 1835 and 1836, in Madison’s own metaphor, the candle of life in the old man at Montpelier sputtered toward its socket. Dolley Madison wrote that “my days are devoted to nursing and comforting my sick patient,” while a visitor observed that “her devotion to Mr. Madison is incessant, and he needs all her constant attention.” ...

read more

Postscript: Dolley Madison, 1836–1849

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-182

Dolley Madison spent the summer after her husband’s death at Montpelier, responding to visits and letters of condolence and pursuing publication of the already gathered and edited volumes of James’s papers. She made an unfortunate decision to put this publication largely in the hands of undependable Payne Todd, ...

Source Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-188

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-192

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-200