Cover

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xvii

I have been thinking about the transnational dynamic that forms the heart of this book for a very long time—the entirety of my scholarly career, in fact. During graduate school at Cornell University more than twenty-five years ago, I had the distinct privilege of working on a research project with two of the great figures in the ...

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CHAPTER 1. Transnational Religious Communities and the Making of US Foreign Policy

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pp. 1-27

A Jesuit priest in California’s Silicon Valley agrees to drop everything and take over as academic vice president of the Universidad Centroamericana (UCA) in San Salvador when that Jesuit university’s entire administration is murdered in cold blood by the Salvadoran military. At the same time, many other Jesuits in the United States devote themselves to halting...

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CHAPTER 2. Ours: Martyrdom in El Salvador, Mobilization in the United States

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pp. 28-67

The rose garden outside the Pastoral Center at the Universidad Centroamericana Jos

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CHAPTER. 3 The People: On Mission from Nicaragua to the United States

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pp. 68-105

Nancy Donovan was already back at the Maryknoll motherhouse in Ossining, New York, when I began to visit her. After thirty years as a missionary in Nicaragua and throughout Central America, she was living with many other retired Maryknoll sisters in a sprawling house that feels more like a large college dormitory than a convent. Way too big for Maryknoll’s dwindling...

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CHAPTER 4. Hospitality: A Covenant between Mexico and Vermont

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pp. 106-150

Known as the “City of Eternal Spring” because of its spectacular year-round weather, Cuernavaca, Mexico, is also notable for its abundant natural beauty—and for its equally abundant, but not always equally visible, local poverty. Amid the visiting tourists, Cuernavaca also features countless children hawking gum, row after row of women selling fruit and fabric, and whole ...

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CHAPTER 5. Conclusion

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pp. 151-167

Running through my academic discipline of political science is a powerful assumption that political activities derive the bulk of their meaning from their influence on public policy. This assumption is not always explicit, and the influence need not be direct or obvious. But somewhere down the causal chain of activity there ought to be a tangible relationship between the action ...

Notes

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pp. 169-180

Bibliography

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pp. 181-186

Index

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pp. 187-196