Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Over the seven years I spent working on this project, I was supported and assisted by more people than I can name here, all of whom have my gratitude, whether mentioned here or not. This book began as a dissertation overseen by Pete...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-20

Paradise Lost is a fallen poem. In telling the story of the Fall of humankind as something that has happened, that is past, Milton’s great epic situates itself in a moment in time after that Fall, within the postlapsarian world whose genesis the poem...

read more

1. Satan and the Poetics of Creation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-51

It was Harold Bloom who, in his Anxiety of Influence, found in Milton’s Satan the beginning of all modern poetry. As an allegory of the “strong poet,” Satan in Bloom’s thinking “shadows forth gigantically a trouble at the core of” poetry from...

read more

2. Fallen Language and Paradise Lost’s Allusions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-97

Bloom identifies Satan as the inception of modern poetry in order to describe how poems within a tradition relate to one another. I would like to argue in the next two chapters that, because Satan is, in fact, the inception of all poetry, at least according...

read more

3. The Particular, the New, and the Tradition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-143

When Satan sets in motion Eve’s and then Adam’s self-creation by presenting them with a negative possibility — the potential to choose difference instead of God’s sameness — he creates a world in which poetry is possible. When he establishes that...

read more

4. Justifying the Ways of God to Men

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-208

The previous chapters have demonstrated the intimate link between Satan’s development in the poem and Paradise Lost’s self-conscious construction as a poem, both in its own right and as a work necessarily situated within a tradition. As the first to fall...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-240

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-246