Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Series Editors’ Preface

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pp. vii-viii

The Civil War in the West has a single goal: to promote historical writing about the war in the western states and territories. It focuses most particularly on the Trans-Mississippi theater, which consisted of Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, most of Louisiana (west of the Mississippi River), Indian Territory...

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Editor’s Preface

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pp. ix-xix

For a number of years I taught American history, wrote books about the history of the Trans-Mississippi West, and even created an entire gallery on the War Between the States for the military history museum at Hill College in Texas. I felt like I had gained at least some mastery of events during the...

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1. The Story Begins

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pp. 1-7

THE WRITER OF this sketch was born, according to the records kept in my father’s old family Bible, January 28th, 1841, in a pine log cabin on the waters of Ocoee River, Polk County, Tennessee. My father, John Bailey, was born in Buncombe County, N.C., in 1794. My grandfather, William...

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2. Becoming a Soldier: Wilson’s Creek and Pea Ridge

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pp. 8-16

WHEN PRESIDENT LINCOLN issued the call for 75,000 men to coerce the South, the war spirit was thoroughly aroused. Meetings were held in every village and neighborhood, and steps taken looking to the organization of companies for service in defense of the South should the country be...

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3. Fighting in Mississippi

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pp. 17-21

THE MARCH SOUTH was resumed next morning [March 9, 1862]. The day following we remained in camp. Under orders to report with his command at Corinth, Miss., General Van Dorn continued the march south across Boston Mountain via Clarksville on the Arkansas River. Then east to...

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4. Siege of Port Hudson and Escape

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pp. 22-34

ABOUT THE 15TH of October [1863], my regiment was detached from the First Missouri Brigade and ordered to Port Hudson, Louisiana. Taking the cars near Holly Springs, Mississippi,we passed through Jackson, the capital of the state, and on to [Tangipahoa, Louisiana], from which place...

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5. Life as a Guerrilla in Arkansas

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pp. 35-61

CAPTAIN POYNOR AND I continued our journey afoot across the country. When within about seventy-five miles of home, we had the good fortune to get horses from friends and rode the balance of the way. On our arrival at home [in September 1863] we found that most of the paroled men...

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6. Collapse of the Confederacy

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pp. 62-71

THE TIME LIMIT of my orders, sixty days, being nearly out [in late October or early November 1864], I got together what men I could, about twelve in number, and again bid good-bye to friends and loved ones and set out on my return trip to my command. We passed through the...

Notes

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pp. 73-128

Bibliography

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pp. 129-140

Index

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pp. 141-148

Back Cover

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