In this Book

Posting It
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Although "snail mail" may seem old fashioned and outdated in the twenty-first century, Catherine Golden argues that the creation of the Penny Post in Victorian England was just as revolutionary in its time as e-mail and text messages are today.

Until Queen Victoria instituted the Postal Reform Act of 1839, mail was a luxury affordable only by the rich. Allowing anyone, from any social class, to send a letter anywhere in the country for only a penny had multiple and profound cultural impacts.

Golden demonstrates how cheap postage--which was quickly adopted in other countries--led to a postal "network" that can be viewed as a forerunner of computer-mediated communications. Indeed, the revolution in letter writing of the nineteenth century led to blackmail, frauds, unsolicited mass mailings, and junk mail--problems that remain with us today.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xvii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-39
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  1. Part 1. Reforms
  2. p. 41
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  1. 1. Why the Victorians Needed a Revolution in Letter Writing
  2. pp. 43-82
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  1. 2. Signed, Sealed, Delivered: Mulreadies, Caricatures, and the Penny Black
  2. pp. 83-112
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  1. Part 2. Outcomes
  2. p. 113
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  1. 5. Benefits and Blessings: Letters Home, Friendship, Death Notices, Courtship, and Valentines by Penny Post
  2. pp. 193-234
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  1. Conclusion: Looking Forward from the Victorian Revolution in Letter Writing to Information Technologies Today
  2. pp. 235-256
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 257-280
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 281-290
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 291-299
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  1. About the Author
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