In this Book

Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary

Langston Hughes never knew of an America where lynching was absent from the cultural landscape. Jason Miller investigates the nearly three dozen poems written by Hughes on the subject of lynching to explore its varying effects on survivors, victims, and accomplices as they resisted, accepted, and executed this brutal form of sadistic torture.

Starting from Hughes's life as a teenager during the Red Summer of 1919 and moving through the civil rights movement that took place toward the end of Hughes's life, Miller initiates an important dialogue between America's neglected history of lynching and some of the world’s most significant poems.

This extended study of the centrality of these heinous acts to Hughes's artistic development, aesthetics, and activism represents a significant and long-overdue contribution to our understanding of the art and politics of Langston Hughes.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. List of Figures
  2. p. ix
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-17
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. The Red Summer of 1919: Finding Reassurance
  2. pp. 18-40
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. The Scottsboro Case and World War II America: Poetic Anger
  2. pp. 41-76
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Negotiating Censorship in the 1950s: Lynching as Analogy
  2. pp. 77-115
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Poetry as Counternarrative: Retelling History
  2. pp. 116-142
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 143-150
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 151-156
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 157-162
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 163-168
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.