In this Book

Cather Studies, Volume 7
summary
Volume 7 of the Cather Studies series explores Willa Cather’s iconic status and its problems within popular and literary culture. Not only are Cather’s own life and work subject to enshrinement, but as a writer, she herself often returned to the motifs of canonization and to the complex relationship between the onlooker and the idealized object. Through textual study of her published novels and her behind-the-scenes campaign and publicity writing in service of her novels, the reader comes to understand the extent to which, despite her legendary claims and commitment to privacy, Willa Cather helped to orchestrate her own iconic status.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. Editorial Policy
  2. p. vii
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  1. Introduction: Willa Cather as Icon
  2. pp. ix-xi
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  1. A Commentary on An Explanation of America
  2. pp. 1-2
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  1. What Happens to Criticism When the Artist Becomes an Icon?
  2. pp. 3-12
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  1. Advertising Cather during the Transition Years (1914–1922)
  2. pp. 13-26
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  1. Willa Cather and Her Public in 1922
  2. pp. 27-45
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  1. A Portrait of an Artist as a Cultural Icon: Edward Steichen, Vanity Fair, and Willa Cather
  2. pp. 46-67
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  1. Willa Cather and the Book-of-the-Month Club
  2. pp. 68-85
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  1. “Two or Three Human Stories”: O Pioneers! and the Old Testament
  2. pp. 86-105
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  1. Barbusse’s L’enfer: A Source for “Coming, Aphrodite!” and “The Novel Démeublé”
  2. pp. 106-118
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  1. Recollecting Emotion in Tranquility: Wordsworth and Byron in Cather’s My Ántonia and Lucy Gayheart
  2. pp. 119-139
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  1. “Have I Changed So Much?”: Jim Burden, Intertextuality, and the Ending of My Ántonia
  2. pp. 140-164
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  1. Shadows on the Rock: Against Interpretation
  2. pp. 165-173
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  1. Cather’s Shadows: Solid Rock and Sacred Canopy
  2. pp. 174-185
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  1. Cather’s Secular Humanism: Writing Anacoluthon and Shooting Out into the Eternities
  2. pp. 186-202
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  1. Subsequent Reflections on Shadows on the Rock
  2. pp. 203-211
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  1. Cather, Freudianism, and Freud
  2. pp. 212-228
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  1. Cather’s Medical Icon: Euclide Auclair, Healing Art, and the Cultivated Physician
  2. pp. 229-252
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  1. The Dialectics of Seeing in Cather’s Pittsburgh: “Double Birthday” and Urban Allegory
  2. pp. 253-268
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  1. Antithetical Icons? Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, and the First World War
  2. pp. 269-287
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  1. Icons and Willa Cather
  2. pp. 288-302
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  1. “A Critic Who Was Worthy of Her”: The Writing of Willa Cather: A Critical Biography
  2. pp. 303-328
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 329-333
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 335-354
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