Front Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction

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pp. vii-xvi

TO THOSE who know and love it, the Shenandoah River remains as Julia Davis described it more than a half century ago—unassuming, “hidden . . .

Dedication

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pp. xvii-xvii

Map

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pp. xviii-xvii

Part I: Promise

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Song

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pp. 3-5

IT IS A SAILOR’S CHANTEY, a lost and hungry chantey, a song of faraway men reminding themselves of things they have loved, a sea song to an . . .

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The Unrecorded Past

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pp. 6-16

THE SHENANDOAH RIVER flows northward for one hundred and fifty miles through a valley in Virginia between the Blue Ridge and the Allegheny . . .

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Exploration

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pp. 17-25

THE WHITE MAN had been fifty years established on the lowlands of the coast. The starving time had been forgotten, forgotten the “country sickness” which . . .

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Settlement

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pp. 26-39

THERE WERE THREE GREAT STRAINS in the early settlement of the Shenandoah Valley: the Germans, and the Scotch-Irish, both Protestant, both with . . .

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Pioneers

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pp. 40-51

AS THE YEARS PASSED life took on a pattern in the Valley—a pattern of small log cabins in the clearings or the grasslands, of long laborious days, . . .

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Washington

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pp. 52-61

IN 1748, Lord Fairfax, pursuing the regulation of his affairs, sent two young men to survey the northern end of his Valley property. One was a cousin, . . .

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Massacres

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pp. 62-68

AFTER BRADDOCK’S DEFEAT, many of the back inhabitants gave themselves up for lost. In Pennsylvania and Maryland the frontiers were almost . . .

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Fort Loudoun

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pp. 69-84

WHEN COLONEL WASHINGTON took charge at Winchester in the September of 1755 he found the countryside in confusion, and he reported on it . . .

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Revolution

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pp. 85-101

FORT LOUDOUN STOOD ON ITS HILL, completed at last in spite of governors and commissaries. Its eighteen cannons made it so formidable that . . .

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Expansion

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pp. 102-112

A FINISHED WAR is just a story for old men. When the Revolution ended and the soldiers of the Shenandoah Valley came home to see what had . . .

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Inventions

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pp. 113-124

SOME HAD INDUSTRIAL AMBITIONS for the Valley, hopes of improving the navigation of the river, where barges regularly floated down but . . .

Part II: Holocaust

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The Fateful Lightning

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pp. 127-140

IN THE SUMMER OF 1860, a professor from the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, a Major Thomas Jonathan Jackson, went north to take . . .

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The Swift Sword

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pp. 141-156

THE CAUSES of our War Between the States are not within the scope of this narrative. Here should be recorded only the fact that it was desperately . . .

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Marching On

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pp. 157-169

GENERAL JACKSON AND HIS BRIGADE won a new name at Manassas. The official records of the battle made him a hero to a nation thirsty for heroes, and . . .

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The Invaded

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pp. 170-181

THE ANGRY GENERAL on the rise below Winchester did not come to his great trial unprepared. Now he was to reap the benefit of the concentration he . .

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Valley Campaign I

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pp. 182-192

ON THE NIGHT AFTER KERNSTOWN, General Jackson, wrapped in his long coat, stood in the slow chill rain turning the embers of a campfire with . . .

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Valley Campaign II

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pp. 193-202

BEHIND THE FEDERAL LINES in the little village of Front Royal, the citizens had adjusted themselves as best they could to the occupation. Young Tommy Ashby, cousin . . .

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Valley Campaign III

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pp. 203-212

WINCHESTER, WHICH WAS to change hands between sixty-eight and seventy-two times before the war ended, had a brief respite, a brief and busy interlude, when . . .

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The Long Year

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pp. 213-229

AND NOW THE VALLEY was again without its army. The two weeks of joy in Winchester fled like a dream, a confused time of troops passing and repassing, a . . .

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The Burning

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pp. 230-242

THE CONFEDERATE ARMY FELL BACK through eastern Virginia, back to Brandy Station, back to the bridge over the Rappahannock, back to winter quarters . . .

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The Starving Crows

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pp. 243-256

GENERAL SHERIDAN’S ARMY, assembling 50,000 strong at Harpers Ferry, was named the Army of the Shenandoah, a fact which gave small satisfaction . . .

Part III: Recovery

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The Hero

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pp. 259-271

ONE AFTERNOON in the early autumn of 1865, a solitary traveler, wearing a gray military coat from which the buttons and insignia had been removed, rode . . .

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The Faith

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pp. 272-281

ANOTHER DISTINGUISHED CONFEDERATE taught at Lexington during the postwar years, although he did not come there until after the general . . .

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Fool's Gold and True Gold

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pp. 282-292

DURING THE LAST THIRTY YEARS of the nineteenth century, the people of the Valley were concerned with one absorbing problem—the necessity of making . . .

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Past into Present

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pp. 293-303

AND AGAIN TIME PASSED into another century, and another great war was just a story for old men. They sat under the oaks, the aging soldiers, and saw . . .

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Valley Tour I

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pp. 304-312

THE PRESENT AND THE PAST have flowed together. There is a new road now along the crest of the old blue mountains. From Rockfish Gap near . . .

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Valley Tour II

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pp. 313-324

NOT FAR FROM FRONT ROYAL, where the hills begin to rise into the mountains, is a remount station of the United States Army, which breeds and trains . . .

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Valley Tour III

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pp. 325-339

GO NORTH THEN ON THE VALLEY PIKE, where at least one man has died for every yard over which the automobile runs equably. You may try to . . .

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Epilogue

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pp. 340-343

THIS THEN, is the Valley of the Shenandoah, a fair land, long in memories and rich in peace. Stonewall Jackson’s trenches on the hills above the Valley Pike . . .

Postscript

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pp. 344-346

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Acknowledgement

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pp. 347-347

A WORK OF THIS KIND must have so much assistance, so many contribute help and interest, that it seems invidious to single out a few. Especial thanks, . . .

Bibliography

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pp. 348-355

About Julia Davis Adams

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pp. 356-356

Back Cover

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