Front Cover

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pp. c-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Series Editor’s Preface

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xii

I state the obvious in saying this book is for those who want to know how to identify Texas freshwater fishes. In field and laboratory courses I teach students how to identify Texas fishes and about their ecology and management, so naturally I am very glad (and I expect my students will be also) to have this field guide as a formal resource. But, who else would benefit from reading and...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

This field guide was developed to help both recreational anglers and serious students of ichthyology identify 161 species of Texas freshwater fishes. Biologists and resource managers will also find it useful as a supplement to the dichotomous key compiled by Hubbs et al. (1991) as well as a companion to...

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About the Fish Descriptions

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pp. 1-2

Habitat associations, life history information, physical characteristics, and other notes of interest are from published texts. A wealth of detailed ecological knowledge exists for many of the fishes described, but such information has been kept brief here to conform to the overall purpose and intent of this guide....

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Drainages of Texas

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pp. 3-3

This map shows the state’s major river drainages, which correspond to the species ranges included in the description of each fish. Large tributaries and smaller streams draining directly into the Gulf of Mexico are not included on this map....

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Common Counts and Measurements

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pp. 4-5

This section describes and illustrates some of the methods of counting and measurement often used during fish identification. These methods are based on the work of Hubbs and Lagler (1949). Photographs of fish are helpful, but to be confident in identifying species one must make careful counts and measurements of fish anatomy as well as examining other distinguishing characteristics....

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Phylogeny of Fishes

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pp. 6-7

This section presents an overview of fish evolution to help the reader understand relationships among the chordate animals generally known as fish. Phylogeny describes the evolutionary history and relationships of taxonomic groups. The term “fish” represents not one but several extinct and extant monophyletic groups of organisms that first arose and began radiating some...

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Key to the Families

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pp. 8-12

This section is written in dichotomous format, which is a series of “yes” or “no” paired questions based on morphological characters that should identify each fish to only one family. The final step in the key leads you to the page where descriptions of species of that family begin. Morphological differences among families are relatively large and easy to recognize; thus the key can be used as...

Species Accounts

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pp. 13-14

Lampreys—Family Petromyzontidae

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pp. 15-16

Sturgeons—Family Acipenseridae

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pp. 17-17

Paddlefish—Family Polyodontidae

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pp. 18-18

Gars—Family Lepisosteidae

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pp. 19-22

Bowfin—Family Amiidae

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pp. 23-23

Goldeye—Family Hiodontidae

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pp. 24-24

American eel—Family Anguillidae

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pp. 25-25

Shads—Family Clupeidae

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pp. 26-27

Carps and Minnows—Family Cyprinidae

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pp. 28-82

Suckers—Family Catostomidae

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pp. 83-91

Tetras—Family Characidae

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pp. 92-92

Bullhead Catfishes—Family Ictaluridae

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pp. 93-102

Suckermouth Catfishes—Family Loricariidae

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pp. 103-103

Pickerels—Family Escocidae

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pp. 104-105

Trouts—Family Salmonidae

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pp. 106-107

Pirate Perch—Family Aphredoderidae

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pp. 107-107

Mullets—Family Mugilidae

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pp. 108-109

Silversides—Family Atherinidae

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pp. 110-112

Livebearers—Family Poeciliidae

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pp. 113-118

Killifishes—Family Fundulidae

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pp. 119-126

Pupfishes—Family Cyprinodontidae

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pp. 127-129

Temperate Basses—Family Moronidae

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pp. 130-133

Black Basses and Sunfishes—Family Centrarchidae

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pp. 134-150

Walleye and Darters—Family Percidae

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pp. 151-171

Drums—Family Sciaenidae

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pp. 172-172

Pygmy Sunfish—Family Elassomatidae

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pp. 173-173

Cichlids—Family Cichlidae

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pp. 174-176

Appendix: Counting Pharyngeal Teeth

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pp. 177-180

Glossary

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pp. 181-194

References

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pp. 195-196

Index

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pp. 197-202