Cover

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pp. c-c

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

CONTENTS

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pp. vii-viii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. ix-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-18

B-movies are frequently labeled as simply being “bad” films, both historically within the film industry and by many modern critics and fans. What this overlooks is how vital B-films have been overall to cinema, particularly from a business perspective. Despite often being ridiculed or dismissed as inconsequential trash, Bs were important commercial entities, not only in...

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Chapter 1

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pp. 19-42

The 1950s B-movie became something that stood apart from its predecessors— not a mere continuation of what came before, but an entity with its own unique role in the history of cinema. While stemming from the production, distribution, and exhibition patterns of the B-movies of previous decades, in the wake of industry-wide change 1950s Bs established innovative ways...

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Chapter 2

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pp. 43-66

At stake in the battle for the Bs in the 1950s was the very survival of B-filmmaking itself. Although many low-budget films established new trends throughout the decade, several Hollywood studios quickly abandoned the B-movie in the decade’s early years, while a few others were (tentatively) dedicated to its ongoing viability. At the same time, Poverty Row studios such...

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Chapter 3

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pp. 67-102

The rise of the new independent studios seeking to compete with Allied Artists and its Poverty Row peers became crucial to the survival of many exhibitors as a product shortage loomed. The 1950s was a period of changing exhibition patterns, as the film industry reacted to transitional forces. Smaller theaters, particularly those in rural areas or in neighborhoods and towns...

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Chapter 4

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pp. 103-130

Of all of the new independent companies to emerge in the 1950s, none was more successful than American International Pictures, largely because it proved the most skilled in reaching the increasingly important teenage audience. Its mid-decade debut signified that a distinct era of B-movie filmmaking was fully under way: if the films of Lippert Pictures Inc. and its competitors...

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Chapter 5

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pp. 131-163

While companies such as American International Pictures allowed B-movies to thrive at the box office in the 1950s, the Bs also had a substantial presence on television in this decade, and, even though scholars often cite television’s growing popularity as a primary cause for the demise of such Poverty Row studios as Republic and PRC/Eagle-Lion, B-filmmaking simultaneously...

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Chapter 6

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pp. 164-200

In teaching students about B-movies, I typically begin by asking them to define the term, in order to determine their preconceptions. More often than not, there is a general consensus that B-equals-bad, to the point that when I screen such critically celebrated films as Detour (1945) and Cat People (1942) in the term’s early weeks many students are often surprised at how...

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Chapter 7

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pp. 201-216

One of the fundamental principles of filmmaking is that of risk, with gambling metaphors proving common when film producers and analysts describe the industry. Perhaps more than any other category of films, the 1950s B-movie exemplifies this risk, given that it was an extremely marginalized entity during a highly transitional period. With films of the 1930s and...

NOTES

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pp. 217-248

INDEX

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pp. 249-262