Cover

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Title

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p. iii

Copyright

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p. iv

Contents

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p. vii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

WHEN Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter Yolanda Denise asked her father why she could not go to Funtown, she touched on a painful reality that has been largely forgotten. Across the country, North and South, young African Americans discovered that time-honored discriminatory practices limited their access...

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1 A Tarnished Golden Age: Race and Recreation Before World War II

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pp. 13-46

IN 1924, when the educator and social activist Dorothy Height was twelve years old, she decided to learn how to swim. Height and a few friends traveled to Pittsburgh’s downtown YWCA and approached the front desk. The receptionist told them simply, “Negro girls [cannot] swim in the YWCA...

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2 The Fifth Freedom: Racial Liberalism, Nonviolence, and Recreation Riots in the 1940s

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pp. 47-87

THE noted black sociologists St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton predicted in 1945 that “racial radicalism” of “gigantic proportions” would follow World War II unless the United States made significant racial progress. African Americans “were aware . . . that they were participating in a titanic struggle...

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3 "A Northern City with a Southern Exposure": Challenging Recreational Segregation in the 1950s

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pp. 88-124

ON a warm summer day in 1952, Marian Spencer, an African American woman living in Cincinnati, heard one of the ubiquitous radio ads for the city’s Coney Island Amusement Park. During the spring and summer “Uncle Al” would lure children to Coney with these words: “Come on, kiddies...

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4 Violence in the City of Good Neighbors: Delinquency and Consumer Rights in the Postwar City

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pp. 125-157

AFTER Brown the amount of formal political activity in northern states to open public accommodations declined. Racial liberals’ efforts to educate the public made blatant support for the segregation of public accommodations less acceptable, and NAACP lawsuits pressured civil rights states...

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5 Building a National Movement: Students Confront Recreational Segregation

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pp. 158-193

SOON after Disneyland opened, a real estate developer from Texas, Angus G. Wynne, Jr., visited the park. Impressed by its popularity, Wynne decided to create his own theme park between Dallas and Fort Worth. Wynne’s theme centered on the history of Texas. He flew six flags over his park representing...

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6 "Riotland": Race and the Decline of Urban Amusements

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pp. 194-225

IN the wake of a recreation riot at Glen Echo Park, Dick West, a columnist for the Chicago Defender, suggested a “new type of amusement park, a place called ‘Riotland,’” be built to accommodate rebellious teenagers. “It would feature such attractions as a ‘Tunnel of Hate’ where the young patrons...

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Conclusion

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pp. 226-234

WHEN Walt Disney opened his new theme park in 1955, Anaheim was at the outskirts of suburban Los Angeles. By the 1980s, however, Disneyland was accessible by public transportation and frequented by local teenagers with discounted annual passes in hand. Customers began to complain that...

Notes

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pp. 235-296

Index

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pp. 297-306

Acknowledgments

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pp. 307-310