Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

The nineteenth-century German historian Leopold von Ranke’s famous dictum for the historian to write wie es eigentlich gewesen [ist ] is commonly translated as “what actually happened.” Far from simply being an admonition not to go . . .

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Introduction: Beyond the “Backlash”

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pp. 3-14

The notion that religious orthodoxy feeds naturally into socioeconomic and political conservatism is arguably one of the most widespread and rarely questioned assumptions among observers of resurgent evangelicalism in . . .

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1. The Enigma of Conservative Protestantism

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pp. 15-41

The dramatic resurgence of white evangelical and fundamentalist Christianity in the United States since the 1940s has left a generation of academics scrambling for explanations. Subscribing to an Enlightenment . . .

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2. The Postwar Neo-Evangelical Awakening

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pp. 42-68

In their desire to reaffirm orthodox Protestantism as a significant cultural and political force in modern American society, a cadre of “progressive fundamentalists” ( Joel Carpenter) or “post-fundamentalist evangelicals” . . .

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3. The Evangelical Left and the 1960s

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pp. 69-110

If the 1940s and 1950s provided ample opportunities for the institutional and theological assertion of conservative Protestantism, the insurgent movements of the 1960s and 1970s challenged neo-evangelicals to add a social and cultural . . .

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4. The Rise of the Christian Right

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pp. 111-150

Observers in the mid-1970s could hardly be faulted for thinking that a type of liberal or at least middle-of-the road evangelicalism, rather than a vociferous and militant Christian Right, had emerged triumphant. Merging . . .

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Conclusion: New Perspectives on American Evangelicalism

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pp. 151-159

The partisan mobilization of conservative Protestants constitutes one of the most remarkable political developments since World War II and the clearest case of political realignment during the past forty . . .

Notes

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pp. 161-191

Bibliography

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pp. 193-212

Index

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pp. 213-225