Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

it is impossible to conduct a project of this magnitude without incurring numerous debts along the way. This book represents both the culmination . . .

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Introduction

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pp. 1-17

the Caribbean coast of Central America is home to numerous English speaking communities of British West Indian descent. From Guatemala to . . .

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1 The Honduran Liberal Reforms and The Rise of West Indian Migration

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pp. 18-36

The initial stages of the West Indian migration experience in Honduras are best understood within the context of the liberal reform period in . . .

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2 Honduran Immigration Legislation and the Rise of Anti–West Indian Sentiment

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pp. 37-53

For much of the modern history of Honduras, the government viewed immigration as a means by which Honduras would obtain the . . .

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3 Countering the “Black Invasion”: The Intellectual Response to West Indian Immigration

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pp. 54-73

The arrival of West Indians on the North Coast of Honduras sparked more than immigration reform. The presence of this mostly black, English-speaking, . . .

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4 West Indian Cultural Retention and Community Formation on The North Coast

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pp. 74-96

The social and cultural values that developed among West Indians in Honduras are best examined within the context of the postemancipation . . .

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5 An Imagined Citizenry: The Racial Realities of British Identity among West Indians in Honduras

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pp. 97-114

The authenticity of West Indian claims of British citizenship and their status in Honduras were recurring themes in the antagonistic relationships . . .

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6 Eradicating The Black Peril: The Deportation of West Indian Workers from Tela and Trujillo, Honduras, 1930–1939

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pp. 115-135

the 1930s proved to be a tumultuous time for West Indians and others of African descent on the North Coast of Honduras. Efforts to halt black . . .

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Epilogue

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pp. 136-143

Emigration is no longer possible, as most countries [in Latin America] have imposed restrictive quotas or barred foreign entry altogether . . . ; thousands . . .

Notes

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pp. 145-169

Bibliography

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pp. 171-193

Index

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pp. 195-202

Map of fruit companies on the North Coast of Honduras

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pp. 28-28