Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 8-9

Ireceived crucial financial support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Council for European Studies. The University of Michigan’s Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies provided me with a supportive environment and resources as I completed this project. Texas A&M University has supplied institutional...

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Introduction

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pp. 10-19

On a beautiful bluebonnet Texas morning in March 2005, I received a telephone call from the mayor of Buzançais, a modest town of four thousand located deep in central France, three hours by train and bus south of Paris. “I understand from reading interviews you gave to local journalists that you’re writing a history of my town,” he said accusingly, “but...

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CHAPTER ONE: The Riot and Its First Renditions

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pp. 20-39

On Wednesday, 13 January 1847, in a working-class faubourg of Buzançais called Les Hervaux, a group of women encountered a convoy of grain halted at an inn.1 Determined to keep its cargo in Buzançais, they sought reinforcements among men working at the nearby charity workshop. Although the men hesitated, the...

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CHAPTER TWO: Repression and Reaction, Challenge and Response

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pp. 40-70

The Buzançais affair, as we have seen, began as a food riot that also expressed especially intense, broad class hostilities and political demands specific to the mid-nineteenth century. It mingled behaviors associated with classic food riots (appeals to authorities to police the market and prices, shipment interceptions, searches, requisitions, and popular pricefixing), with carnivalesque inversions...

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CHAPTER THREE: Buzançais in Nineteenth-Century Politics and Literature

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pp. 71-99

Throughout the second half of the nineteenth century, the story of Buzançais remained in the memories of some who had lived through it and of others who had perhaps read about it in the press’s widely circulated stories about the riot and the trial that followed. Evidence of these memories appears in polemics and...

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CHAPTER FOUR: Popular Publishing between the Wars

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pp. 100-134

Soon after World War I, two new narratives appeared, in 1919 and 1925, respectively, an era by which living memory of 1847 had died out. Each narrative presents a dramatically different version—textually but also, for the first time, visually—of the Buzançais affair. In 1919, a Paris publisher, Edouard-Joseph, produced the first book version of Vallès, Les Blouses, and engaged Mario Simon to illustrate it.1 In...

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CHAPTER FIVE: Jacquerie as Cartoon and Television Drama

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pp. 135-179

After World War II, the Buzançais affair reappeared not only in familiar genres—such as the political press, historical fiction, and crime stories— but also in other media that renewed its importance to the general public: the cartoon strip, television, historical scholarship, local history, genealogy, and theatrical performance...

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CHAPTER SIX: Buzançais Rendered in History, Patrimony, and Sound and Light

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pp. 180-210

During the 1970s, several elements converged in new appropriations of the Buzançais story by such genres as scholarly history and works associated with la patrimoine (heritage preservation and promotion) movement. These factors included the success of the “new history” (encompassing the Annales school, social history, and regional and local studies) among professional historians; a long...

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Epilogue

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pp. 211-217

In December 2006, while surfing the Web, I discovered that the story of Buzançais had made it into the contested realm of globalization, by way of the blogosphere. “Buzançais, le 13 janvier 1847” appeared in an issue of the monthly cyberzine CQFD: Ce qu’il faut dire, détruire, dévélopper.1 CQFD presents itself as an “independent publication . . . committed to social criticism and experimentation....

Notes

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pp. 218-259

Index

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pp. 260-265