Cover

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Writing this book has brought me great joy and great sorrow. I have been confronted by an America both beautiful and terrible. Along the way, my travels have been . . .

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INTRODUCTION: Race, Religion, and the Fracturing of the White Republic

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pp. 1-19

In 1867, the NewYork artist J. L. Giles engraved the image of a dream for the future of the United States. Its title, “Reconstruction,” was simple, but its vision was extraordinary. Giles . . .

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1. THE LAST AND GREATEST BATTLE OF FREEDOM: Race and the American Nation after the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

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pp. 20-50

Northerners had little to celebrate on Easter Sunday in 1865. A day usually set aside for cheer became an occasion for mourning and sorrow. New York City was draped in black, . . .

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2. ON THE VERGE OF HEAVEN: Religious Missions, Interracial Contact, and the Radicalism of Radical Reconstruction

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pp. 51-86

After serving as a doctor among African American soldiers during the Civil War, Esther Hawks was teaching black children in Charleston, South Carolina, when news of . . .

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3. THE APOSTLES OF FORGIVENESS: Religion and National Reunion in Northern Society, Popular Culture, and National Politics, 1865–1875

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pp. 87-119

For many missionaries to the South, northern newspapers and monthly magazines were highly coveted commodities. They provided social sustenance for the teachers and kept . . .

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4. INVENTOR OF LEGENDS MIRACULOUS: National Reconciliation and Racial Segregation during America’s Third Great Awakening

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pp. 120-145

During the tumultuous spring of 1865, when the war had ended but the fate of the nation remained undetermined, an interdenominational body of Protestant leaders in Missouri . . .

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5. THE WHITE FLAG WAVES: Spiritual Reunion and Genocidal Visions during the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1878

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pp. 146-173

Few southern whites were more passionate about or dedicated to the Confederacy and the Lost Cause than Father Abram J. Ryan, a Catholic priest and poet in New . . . .

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6. NO NORTH, NO SOUTH, NO SECTIONALISM IN POLITICS, NO SEX IN CITIZENSHIP: Race, Nationalism, and Gender Politics in the Rise of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union

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pp. 174-208

Like many other southern white women after the Civil War, Belle Kearney often felt depressed about the condition of Dixie. Born in 1863 to an affluent family near Vernon, . . .

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7. TO THE PERSON SITTING IN DARKNESS: Global Missions, Religious Belief, and the Making of the Imperial White Republic

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pp. 209-243

On February 17, 1898, the United States lost its most powerful female leader. After battling anemia intermittently for several years and influenza for weeks, Frances Willard . . .

EPILOGUE: Dreaming of the White Republic, Defending the Souls of Black Folk

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pp. 244-249

Notes

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pp. 251-302

Bibliography

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pp. 303-344

Index

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pp. 345-356

Illustrations

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