In this Book

Beyond Health, Beyond Choice
summary

Current public health promotion of breastfeeding relies heavily on health messaging and individual behavior change. Women are told that “breast is best” but too little serious attention is given to addressing the many social, economic, and political factors that combine to limit women’s real choice to breastfeed beyond a few days or weeks. The result: women’s, infants’, and public health interests are undermined.  Beyond Health, Beyond Choice examines how feminist perspectives can inform public health support for breastfeeding.

 

Written by authors from diverse disciplines, perspectives, and countries, this collection of essays is arranged thematically and considers breastfeeding in relation to public health and health care; work and family; embodiment (specifically breastfeeding in public); economic and ethnic factors; guilt; violence; and commercialization. By examining women’s experiences and bringing feminist insights to bear on a public issue, the editors attempt to reframe the discussion to better inform public health approaches and political action. Doing so can help us recognize the value of breastfeeding for the public’s health and the important productive and reproductive contributions women make to the world.

Table of Contents

  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. Preface and Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction: Breastfeeding Constraints and Realities
  2. pp. 1-11
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  1. Part I: Frames
  2. pp. 13-13
  1. Chapter 1 Feminism and Breastfeeding: Rhetoric, Ideology, and the Material Realities of Women’s Lives
  2. pp. 15-24
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  1. Chapter 2 Breastfeeding Promotion through Gender Equity: A Theoretical Perspective for Public Health Practice
  2. pp. 25-35
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  1. Chapter 3 Breastfeeding in Public Health: What Is Needed for Policy and Program Action?
  2. pp. 36-50
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  1. Part II: Studying Breastfeeding across Race, Class, and Culture
  2. pp. 51-51
  1. Chapter 4 Breastfeeding across Cultures: Dealing with Difference
  2. pp. 53-63
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  1. Chapter 5 The Dangers of Baring the Breast: Structural Violence and Formula-Feeding among Low-Income Women
  2. pp. 64-73
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  1. Chapter 6 Racism, Race, and Disparities in Breastfeeding
  2. pp. 74-83
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  1. Part III: Medical Institutions and Health Education
  2. pp. 85-85
  1. Chapter 7 Pediatrics, Obstetrics, and Shrinking Maternal Authority
  2. pp. 87-97
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  1. Chapter 8 New Professions and Old Practices: Lactation Consulting and the Medicalization of Breastfeeding
  2. pp. 98-109
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  1. Chapter 9 Preparing Women to Breastfeed: Teaching Breastfeeding in Prenatal Classes in the United Kingdom
  2. pp. 110-119
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  1. Part IV: Roles and Realities
  2. pp. 121-121
  1. Chapter 10 “Are We There Yet?”: Breastfeeding as a Gauge of Carework by Mothers
  2. pp. 123-132
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  1. Chapter 11 Breastfeeding and the Gendering of Infant Care
  2. pp. 133-143
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  1. Chapter 12 Working out Work: Race, Employment, and Public Policy
  2. pp. 144-156
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  1. Chapter 13 The Impact of Workplace Practices on Breastfeeding Experiences and Disparities among Women
  2. pp. 157-166
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  1. Part V: Making and Marketing Mothers’ Milk
  2. pp. 167-167
  1. Chapter 14 Marketing Mothers’ Milk: The Markets for Human Milk and Infant Formula
  2. pp. 169-179
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  1. Chapter 15 Empowerment or Regulation?: Women’s Perspectives on Expressing Milk
  2. pp. 180-189
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  1. Part VI: Morality and Guilt
  2. pp. 191-191
  1. Chapter 16 Feminist Breastfeeding Promotion and the Problem of Guilt
  2. pp. 193-202
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  1. Chapter 17 Breastfeeding in the Margins: Navigating through the Conflicts of Social and Moral Order
  2. pp. 203-211
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  1. Chapter 18 Reinstating Pleasure in Reality: Promoting Breastfeeding through Ars Erotica
  2. pp. 215-225
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  1. Chapter 19 Breastfeeding in the “Baby Block”: Using Reality Television to Effectively Promote Breastfeeding
  2. pp. 226-235
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  1. Chapter 20 Rethinking the Importance of Social Class: How Mass Market Magazines Portray Infant Feeding
  2. pp. 236-245
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  1. Part VIII: Sexuality and Women’s Bodies
  2. pp. 247-247
  1. Chapter 21 Breastfeeding in Public: Women’s Bodies, Women’s Milk
  2. pp. 249-258
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  1. Chapter 22 Sexual or Maternal Breasts?: A Feminist View of the Contested Right to Breastfeed Publicly
  2. pp. 259-268
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  1. Chapter 23 Intersections: Child Sexual Abuse and Breastfeeding
  2. pp. 269-279
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  1. Conclusion Beyond Health, Beyond Choice: New Ways Forward in Public Health
  2. pp. 281-285
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 287-326
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  1. Notes on Contributors
  2. pp. 327-332
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 333-338
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