Front Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Nobody writes alone, thank goodness. Over the years, many people have shared with me their insights, questions, comments, and encouragement. I especially want to thank Collin Brooke, Ralph Cintron, Sharon Crowley, . . .

read more

Introduction: Rhetorical Vistas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-22

If you meander through the University of Texas campus, you will eventually stumble upon the remnants of an old creek hiding among the concrete streets and massive buildings. The campus was built alongside Waller Creek, . . .

read more

1. Rhetoric's Development Crisis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-43

It’s ten o’clock in the morning and the humidity is already making it feel like a summer afternoon. I reluctantly pull into the strip mall that I have driven by almost every day for three years. The huge parking lot is always empty, . . .

2. The Public Subject of Feeling (with exceptions)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-69

read more

3. Vultures and Kooks: The Rhetoric of Injury Claims

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-98

On June 7, 1990, an unusual thing happened in Austin. Hundreds of people crammed into a small place in order to listen to an all-night string of musicians, poets, and regular citizens talk about the beauty and sacredness of . . .

read more

4. Lost Places and Memory Claims

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-128

On New Year’s Eve 1980, Austin experienced one hell of a farewell party. On stage in a loud and rowdy music hall were some of the greatest musicians of the time. Everyone had gathered together to say good-bye to the Armadillo . . .

read more

5. The Good and the Bad: Gentrification and Equivalence Claims

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-162

The story of east Austin has been a remarkable example of development rhetoric in action. At one point, east Austin was considered a dangerous place. Many years ago, I found myself sitting in an apartment hunter’s office in . . .

read more

6. Inquiry as Social Action

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-196

I mentioned in chapter 1 that we needed to cultivate public subjects who are capable of imagining themselves as situated within many complex networks. Not only are we all located within a specific home-work nexus, but we are also . . .

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 197-200

I struggled with what to call this short, concluding section. I could always call it a conclusion, but that designation may give the wrong impression that I will now tie up all the loose ends that have been unraveled in the last six . . .

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-205

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-227

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-230

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF