Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

The myth of the single- authored book lives on in spite of the fact we are all in on the secret. The book in your hands would not be possible without the cooperation and contribution of many different individuals..

read more

1. Setting the Transnational Stage

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-31

“What are we going to do with your hair?” was the band director’s worried comment when he met me at the airport in La Paz. He added this problem to his lengthy list of concerns that would have to be addressed before the band left to tour...

read more

2. “What’s Up with You, Condor?”: Performing Indigeneities

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 32-59

Around 1977, the sound of the quena “grabbed” Koji Hishimoto. “That year, Andean music was in fashion here in Japan,” he told me. On a November evening of our tour, we were sitting on tatami mats in a traditional Japanese hotel or...

read more

3. “The Chinese Food of Ethnic Music”: Work And Value in Musical Otherness

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 60-90

After arriving in Japan, recovering from jet lag, and holding a first rehearsal, we launched into an intense first week of work in which we were giving three performances a day in multiple locations, all in the still scorching summer...

read more

4. A Hobby, a Sojourn, and a Job

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-121

“Can I smoke here?” Takashi Sugiyama asked me somewhat nervously. Sugiyama had been living in Bolivia for thirteen years. I had not met him during my own ongoing interactions with La Paz’s world of musicians, perhaps because Sugiyama...

read more

5. Intimate Distance

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 122-148

In a noisy Tokyo restaurant, I chatted with Eduardo Prado during his brief lunch hour.1 When we spoke, he was working an office job and playing “folklore” very much as a secondary project on the side. He was one of the few Bolivians I interviewed...

read more

6. Gringa in Japan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-166

During three months of touring, we performed primarily in public schools and moved daily throughout the islands, going from the northernmost, Hokkaido, all the way to the southernmost, Okinawa. A small bus became our principal...

read more

7. Conclusion: One’s Own Music, Someone Else’s Nation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-177

At one level, this book has been about the intercultural nexus of Bolivian music in Japan as an ethnographic space through which to ground what often have been called sweepingly and ambiguously “transnational cultural...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-199

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-218

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-230