Cover

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pp. c-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-18

In 1716, the English Carmelite nuns of Antwerp, needing a larger crypt for burials, hired laborers, who took down “an entire side of the vault, in which eleven or twelve religious had been buried.” One of these was Margaret Wake (in religion Mother Mary Margaret of the Angels), who “had been buried thirty-eight years and two months” and for whom...

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Chapter One

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pp. 19-60

In the miraculous events that transpired at the Antwerp Carmel in 1716, and in the texts produced as a result, we see the operations of incarnational piety, epistemology, textuality, and politics bringing into focus some problems with such binary categories as medieval and early modern, domestic and foreign. This chapter adds Catholic and Protestant...

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Chapter Two

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pp. 61-96

In an essay on the Chinese Manchu prince Yihuan’s poetry about the destruction of the Summer Palace by British and French troops in 1860, Vera Schwarz elegantly declares that “[p]recisely because the past is a fragile, slippery dream, it can hardly be contained by something as exacting as words.”1 In this chapter, I consider the ways in which words...

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Chapter Three

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pp. 97-146

Within a decade of its foundation, the community of English Benedictine nuns of Cambrai found itself in conflict with figures of patriarchal authority over distinctive aspects of their spirituality and their textual production, a state of affairs that would have been quite familiar to St. Birgitta of Sweden and St. Catherine of Siena. English Benedictine officials...

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Chapter Four

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pp. 147-192

The devotional practices and textual product ions of the English Benedictine nuns of Ghent and Dunkirk illustrate ways in which modes of spirituality rooted in the medieval past shape political relations in the nuns’ present, the era of the Civil War and Protectorate, with an aim of bringing a version of that past back to life in the future. In...

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Chapter Five

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pp. 193-240

In the responses to the lives and life writings of Margery Kempe, Anna Trapnel, and Elizabeth Cary, we see political instabilities magnified when these women suggest options for alternative systems of social relations as they relive past holy lives, make their own lives textually accessible to others, and destabilize binary relationships of past and present, male...

Notes

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pp. 241-324

Index

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pp. 325-340

Back Cover

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pp. bc-bc