Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

In many respects, John Henry Black was typical of the thousands of volunteers who fought for the Union during the Civil War. The son of Jacob and Mary Black, he had been born on his father’s farm near Canan Station, Allegheny Township, Pennsylvania, on July 28, 1834. Black’s grandfather, Adam, a native of...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvii-xviii

The editors wish to acknowledge the Jefferson County Historical Association for permission to reprint the letters of John H. Black of the Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry, which were published previously by that organization. We are especially appreciative to John E. Stealey III of Shepherd University for his willingness...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xix

The American Civil War certainly does not lack for published source material. Before the conflict had even ended, thousands of memoirs, biographies, and regimental and campaign histories were printed. Despite this outpouring, scores of new books are published each year, indicative of the fascination many Americans still...

read more

Chapter 1: 1861

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-4

John Black would spend most of the Civil War in the ranks of the Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry. He did, however, have an earlier taste of soldiering. In April 1861, Black enlisted in the Fourteenth Pennsylvania Infantry, a three-month regiment organized when Northerners still thought the war...

read more

Chapter 2: 1862

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-36

On January 24, 1862, twenty-seven-year-old John Henry Black strode into a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, recruiting station to enroll in the newly formed Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry. Black’s enlistment papers show that he was five feet seven inches tall, with brown hair and beard, blue...

read more

Chapter 3: 1863 [Image Plates]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-60

When John Black returned to the Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry in December 1862, he found the regiment encamped at Kearneysville, Virginia, guarding the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. For most of the remainder of the war, the regiment served in the...

read more

Chapter 4: 1864

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-90

The year 1864 would bring an increase in major military operations in the Shenandoah Valley. Confederate leaders realized that the lower valley must be given primary attention since it remained the gateway to the Union capital...

read more

Chapter 5: 1865

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-120

By early 1865 it appeared to most observers that the Confederacy was on the verge of collapse. Lincoln’s reelection the previous November had dashed Southern hopes for a negotiated settlement to the war. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, having withstood Grant’s onslaught throughout...

read more

Chapter 6: Postwar Years

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-124

Despite the seriousness of his Civil War wounds, John Black lived for nearly sixty years after the conflict. He was able to maintain a relatively active lifestyle, although his physical problems greatly affected him. Returning to his prewar occupation, Black taught in the Duncansville school system for several years after the war, and he and Jennie lived in her family home in Duncansville...

Appendix: Service of the Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 125-128

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-152

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-160

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-170

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF