Cover

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pp. c-i

Frontispiece

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pp. ii-ii

Book Title

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pp. iii-iii

Copyright Page

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pp. iv-iv

Contents

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pp. v-v

Illustrations

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pp. vi-vi

Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-3

Between 1880 and 1920 Paul Carus wrote 74 books and nearly 1,500 articles on philosophy, religion, history, literature, politics, poetry, mathematics, and more (McCoy 1987, 76-111, 364-66; Sheridan 1957, 164-228).1 He oversaw the publication of 113 issues of The Monist and 732 issues of The Open Court....

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1. Paul Carus's Early Life

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pp. 4-11

Paul Carus was born 18 July 1852 to Gustav and Laura Krueger Carus-"descending from a family of distinguished scholars," according to Julius Goebel (1919, 513). At the time Gustav Carus was thirty-three years old and pastor of the Lutheran church at Ilsenburg am Harz; he rose steadily in the...

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2. The Philosophy of Monism and Meliorism

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pp. 12-20

"Thought for its own sake is a disease," wrote Paul Carns (1891b, 361). "Thought should always end in the regulation or adjustment of our behavior toward our surroundings. If it does not, it is not the right kind of thought." As he told Edwin N. Lewis (5 Oct. 1897), editor of the...

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3. Open Court's First Year

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pp. 21-44

The beginnings of the Open Court Publishing Company lie, oddly enough, in zinc. The company's existence, location, endowment, and even to some extent its character-all derive from the nineteenth-century exigencies of processing zinc ore into a usable product....

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4. The Religion of Science

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pp. 45-63

Paul Carus had always wanted to be a missionary, and now he had found his pulpit-a somewhat different one than his parents had planned for him. His original intention had dissolved, as we have seen:...

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5. The World's Parliament of Religions

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pp. 64-80

"The Parliament of Religions, which sat in Chicago from September 11 to September 27,1893, was a great surprise to the world," wrote Paul Carus (1916,1) shortly after its adjournment.! Carus himself was not taken by surprise: since the middle of July he had been scheduled to read a thirty-minute...

Gallery

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pp. 81-88

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6. Looking Toward the East

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pp. 89-117

Of all the ways in which Paul Carus sought to promote the religion of science, by far the most consequential was Open Court's patronage of Oriental religion and philosophy, especially Buddhism. Carl Jackson, author of The Oriental Religions and American Thought: Nineteenth-Century Explorations (1981),...

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7. Mach

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pp. 118-124

Paul Carus and Edward C. Hegeler agreed on more than the abstract doctrines of monism. In his first letter to Hegeler in January 1887 Carus proposed that he conduct a section of The Open Court to be called "Transatlantic Review," containing summaries of recent European publications, inventions,...

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8. Peirce

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pp. 125-141

Paul Carus had a way of taking up with incongruous people. His friend W. E. Leonard wrote, "In turning over the pages of The Monist, The Open Court, or his numerous books, besides vigorous correspondence with such distinguished and ill-assorted friends as Ernst Haeckel, Tolstoy, and Pere Hyacinthe,...

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9. Carus's Later Philosophy

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pp. 142-152

"There must be a reason fo'r the reliability of knowledge," Carus wrote in The Philosophy of Form (1911b, 1), the most concise and systematic statement of his views. "The aim of all my writings centers in the endeavor to build up a sound and tenable philosophy, one that would be as objective as any...

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10. The Great War

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pp. 153-174

Much of the same logic that led Carus to reject hedonism also led him to reject pacifism. "There are good,s in this world which are higher than human lives," he wrote in reaction to the second National Peace Congress, held in Chicago in May 1909. "There are super-individual interests, there are ideals dearer...

Notes

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pp. 175-184

References

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pp. 185-198

Index

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pp. 199-205

Back Cover

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pp. bc-bc