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Fireside Politics
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In Fireside Politics, Douglas B. Craig provides the first detailed and complete examination of radio's changing role in American political culture between 1920 and 1940—the medium's golden age, when it commanded huge national audiences without competition from television. Craig follows the evolution of radio into a commercialized, networked, and regulated industry, and ultimately into an essential tool for winning political campaigns and shaping American identity in the interwar period. Finally, he draws thoughtful comparisons of the American experience of radio broadcasting and political culture with those of Australia, Britain, and Canada.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. List of Maps, Illustrations, Figures, and Tables
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. xi-xviii
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. p. xix
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  1. Part I: Making the Medium, 1895–1940
  2. p. 1
  1. 1 The Radio Age: The Growth of Radio Broadcasting, 1895–1940
  2. pp. 3-17
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  1. 2 Radio Advertising and Networks
  2. pp. 18-35
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  1. 3 Regulatory Models and the Radio Act of 1927
  2. pp. 36-58
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  1. 4 The Federal Radio Commission, 1927–1934
  2. pp. 59-77
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  1. 5 A New Deal for Radio? The Communications Act of 1934
  2. pp. 78-91
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  1. 6 The Federal Communications Commission and Radio, 1934–1940
  2. pp. 92-110
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  1. Part II: Radio and the Business of Politics, 1920–1940
  2. p. 111
  1. 7 The Sellers: Stations, Networks, and Political Broadcasting
  2. pp. 113-139
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  1. 8 The Buyers: National Parties, Candidates, and Radio
  2. pp. 140-166
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  1. 9 The Product: Radio Politics and Campaigning
  2. pp. 167-185
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  1. 10 The Consumers: Radio, Audiences, and Voters
  2. pp. 186-202
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  1. Part III: Radio and Citizenship, 1920–1940
  2. p. 203
  1. 11 Radio and the Problem of Citizenship
  2. pp. 205-233
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  1. 12 Radio at the Margins: Broadcasting and the Limits of Citizenship
  2. pp. 234-257
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  1. 13 Radio and the Politics of Good Taste
  2. pp. 258-278
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 279-284
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 285-328
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 329-350
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 351-362
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  1. Library of Congress Information
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