Cover

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pp. c-c

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-2

This book, like all books, is the work of many hands. From its conception, through writing, revising, and finally to production, it has benefited from a collective knowledge much vaster and insights sharper than my own. Through this process, ideas have been shared, mistakes have been corrected, limitations shored up, and prose sharpened. (Needless to say,...

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1. Introduction: Printing Production Values

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pp. 3-27

In 1713 a printer from the outskirts of the British kingdom, one James Watson of Edinburgh, found it necessary to clear the name of what he saw as a debased profession. Using his proximity to the communication technology of his day, he printed, distributed, and sold The History of the Art of Printing, his own translation of the anonymous French “The History...

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2. Printers’ Manuals and the Bodies of Type

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pp. 28-59

On the first page of Mechanick Exercises on the Whole Art of Printing (1683–84), Joseph Moxon dedicates what he calls his “Piece of Typographie” to the several partners who ran the Press at the University of Oxford. Of course, Moxon’s text is a piece on typography in that typography is one of the many topics he covers in his expansive treatise. But...

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3. Citizen, Hero, or Midwife? Re-presenting the Bookseller

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pp. 60-90

The battle between Grub Street writers and booksellers has long been an accepted trope in eighteenth-century studies, emblematized most vividly by the infamous wrangling between Alexander Pope and Edmund Curll. With literary criticism’s tradition of celebrating great authors and their works of inspired genius, it is not surprising that scholars have, in...

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4. From Authorized Print to Authoritative Author: The Regulated Trade

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pp. 91-126

In the foundational article “What Is an Author,” Michel Foucault claims of a book or text with an author that its

status as property is historically secondary to the penal code controlling its appropriation. Speeches and books were assigned real authors . . . only when the author became subject to...

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5. The Printer as Author: Samuel Richardson, Intellectual Property, and the Feminine Text

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pp. 127-157

The last three chapters have explored the role of printers, booksellers, and other print workers in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, illustrating the ways in which reading the rhetoric of the trade forces us to examine more critically our anachronistic notions of the intangibility of literary work. Those within the print trade should be...

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6. The Ghost in the Machine: Invisible Print in a Digital Age

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pp. 158-174

Viewing the eighteenth-century print culture of England as many of its denizens viewed it—as bodies laboring to make goods for the market as well as rich text circulating mores and meanings—can make us uncomfortable. Difficult issues are engendered by textual materiality. When we acknowledge our texts’ status as commodities, as always already an economic...

Notes

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pp. 175-210

Bibliography

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pp. 211-222

Index

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pp. 223-bc