In this Book

The Big House after Slavery
summary
The Big House after Slavery examines the economic, social, and political challenges that Virginia planter families faced following Confederate defeat and emancipation. Amy Feely Morsman addresses how men and women of the planter class responded to postwar problems and how their adaptations to life without slavery altered their marital relationships and their conceptions of gender roles.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. c-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-12
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  1. ONE. "By Hard Labour and Close Economy" Virginia Planters Go To Work
  2. pp. 13-53
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  1. TWO. Keeping Up Appearances A Crisis of Status in Virginia's Postwar Plantation Households
  2. pp. 54-90
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  1. THREE. "For Our Mutual Protection and Advancement" Planter Families in Virginia's Postbellum Voluntary Organizations
  2. pp. 91-124
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  1. FOUR. Baring Virginia's Bosom for Political Gain Politicians, Manhood, and Debt
  2. pp. 125-157
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  1. FIVE. Abandoning the Homestead How the Next Generation Embraced a New South
  2. pp. 158-192
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 193-198
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 199-248
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 249-264
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 265-276
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