Cover

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Title, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiii

Color Insert

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Introduction: Indigenism and Chicana/o Muralism: The Radicalization of an Aesthetic

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pp. 1-31

Two Aztec warriors, dressed in full regalia, clasp arms as they engage in a ritual dance with a mountainous landscape stretching behind them. Aside from inhabiting this idyllic environment, these heroes also physically reside within the barrio setting of East Los Angeles, where Ernesto de la...

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1. The Dialectics of Continuity and Disruption: Chicana/o and Mexican Indigenist Murals

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pp. 32-65

As stipulated in the introduction to this volume, Chicana/o Indigenism was deeply influenced by the Indigenist discourses that emerged in Mexico aft er the Revolution of 1910. Th e various mural cycles commissioned by the Mexican government throughout the first half of the twentieth century...

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2. The Chicano Movement and Indigenist Murals: The Formation of a Nationalist Canon and Identity

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pp. 66-99

By the early 1970s, once Chicana/o activists had established the civil rights movement and the Chicano Movement as viable platforms through which people of color could articulate their newly politicized identities, they also needed a visual repertoire to accompany or complement...

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3. Graffiti and Murals: Urban Culture and Indigenist Glyphs

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pp. 100-139

It should come as no surprise that Chicana/o muralism emerged in the same spaces where graffiti, tagging, throw-ups, and plaqueasos/placas were and continue to be prominent in the urban landscapes of California. Though community muralism, Chicana/o Indigenism, and graffiti are creative...

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4. The Chicana/o Mural Environment: Indigenist Aesthetics and Urban Spaces

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pp. 140-175

As I stipulated in the introduction to this volume, Indigenist imagery in muralism was meant to function as a metaphorical and tangible platform where Chicana/o artists could carve out spaces for the articulation of cultural citizenship and decolonizing creative expressions. The space, site...

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5. Gender, Indigenism, and Chicana Muralists

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pp. 176-210

The chosen medium for the politically engaged Chicana/o artist in the 1970s was undoubtedly the public mural.1 Indeed, the public mural was deeply saturated with a powerful history of politicization as well as a profound connection to indigenous artistic traditions. But murals also possessed...

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6. Murals and Postmodernism: Post-movimiento, Heterogeneity, and New Media in Chicana/o Indigenism

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pp. 211-240

The changes in the Chicana/o mural scene and its accompanying Indigenist vocabulary ushered in by individuals like graffiti artists, Chicana muralists, and others greatly contributed to a breaking down of some of the monolithic notions of identity that at times defined these public works of...

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Epilogue

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pp. 241-244

One of the most motivating reasons that I took a specific interest in the Indigenist iconography found in California Chicana/o murals was that I immediately understood that the recurrence of this imagery functioned as a sort of chronic symptom of Chicana/o culture at the end of the twentieth...

Notes

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pp. 245-268

Bibliography

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pp. 269-282

Index

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pp. 283-292