In this Book

The Underground Railroad in Connecticut
summary
Here are the engrossing facts about one of the least-known movements in Connecticut's history--the rise, organization, and operations of the Underground Railroad, over which fugitive slaves from the South found their way to freedom. Drawing his data from published sources and, perhaps more importantly, from the still-existing oral tradition of descendants of Underground agents, Horatio Strother tells the detailed story in this book, originally published in 1962. He traces the routes from entry points such as New Haven harbor and the New York state line, through important crossroads like Brooklyn and Farmington. Revealing the dangers fugitives faced, the author also identifies the high-minded lawbreakers who operated the system--farmers and merchants, local officials and judges, at least one United States Senator, and many dedicated ministers of the Gospel. These narratives are set against the larger background of the development of slavery and abolitionism in America-- conversations still relevant today.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. c-c
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-2
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-9
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  1. 1. Blazing the Trail
  2. pp. 10-24
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  1. 2. Thorny Is the Pathway
  2. pp. 25-42
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  1. 3. Fugitives in Flight
  2. pp. 43-64
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  1. 4. The Captives of the Amistad
  2. pp. 65-81
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  1. 5. A House Divided
  2. pp. 82-92
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  1. 6. "This Pretended Law We Cannot Obey"
  2. pp. 93-106
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  1. 7. New Haven, Gateway from the Sea
  2. pp. 107-118
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  1. 8. West Connecticut Trunk Lines
  2. pp. 119-127
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  1. 9. East Connecticut Locals
  2. pp. 128-136
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  1. 10. Valley Line to Hartford
  2. pp. 137-149
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  1. 11. Middletown, a Way Station
  2. pp. 150-162
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  1. 12. Farmington, the Grand Central Station
  2. pp. 163-174
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  1. 13. The Road in Full Swing
  2. pp. 175-188
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  1. Images
  2. pp. G1-G8
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  1. Appendices
  2. pp. 189-190
  1. 1. Narrative of Mr. Nehemiah Caulkins of Waterford, Connecticut
  2. pp. 191-209
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  1. 2. Underground Railroad Agents in Connecticut
  2. pp. 210-211
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  1. 3. Slaves and Free Negroes in Connecticut, 1639–1860
  2. pp. 212-212
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  1. 4. Antislavery Societies in Connecticut, 1837
  2. pp. 213-215
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  1. 5. Slaves in Connecticut, 1830
  2. pp. 216-218
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 219-238
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 239-252
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 253-262
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