Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vii

Illustrations

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p. ix

Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xiii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

Most of the ideas behind this book germinated in discussions I had as a graduate student at the University of Warwick, where I found a community made up of a diversity of thinkers with different perspectives and a shared aim of thinking life through philosophy...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

Gilles Deleuze is now considered to be one of the most important continental philosophers of the twentieth century. Deleuze’s philosophy marked a radical break with the dominant postwar phenomenological tradition in France and a return to metaphysics...

Part One: The Problem of Representation

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pp. 9-66

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1. Deleuze and Transcendental Empiricism

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pp. 11-40

In the first part of this book, the aim will be to determine the nature and limitations of representation. In characterizing the nature of representation, our focus will be on its place in the work of three thinkers: Kant, Aristotle, and Russell. Each of these thinkers provides an account...

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2. Difference and Identity

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pp. 41-66

In the last chapter we explored the extent to which Deleuze tries to overcome what he considers to be the limitations of the Kantian approach to philosophy. Kant’s approach essentially required predication to take place through a third term, the understanding, that provides a common ground...

Part Two: Responses to Representation

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pp. 67-157

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3. Bergonism

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pp. 69-89

In the second part of this work, I want to set out in detail how Hegel and Deleuze respond to the problematic nature of representation that we discovered in part 1. In the first chapter we looked at the general conditions of a transcendental empiricism...

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4. The Virtual and the Actual

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pp. 91-123

In an afterword written in 1988 to his study, Bergsonism, Deleuze calls attention to the three themes of Bergson’s work that he believes must be pursued if we are to continue to practice metaphysics. These are intuition, the relation of science and metaphysics...

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5. Infinite Thought

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pp. 125-157

In this chapter, we will move on to Hegel’s solution as presented primarily in the Science of Logic. Rather than moving to a quasitranscendental theory to attempt to supplement what is missing from classical logic, Hegel’s strategy is instead to try to set the categories of thought themselves in motion through...

Part 3: Beyond Representation

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pp. 159-238

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6. Hegel and Deleuze on Ontology and the Calculus

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pp. 161-186

In the final part of this book, I want to bring Hegel and Deleuze directly into relation with one another. So far, we have seen that Hegel and Deleuze develop their philosophies in response to the same problematic, the question of representation. We are now...

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7. Force, Difference, and Opposition

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pp. 187-210

In the previous chapter, we explored the differences between the approaches of Hegel and Deleuze in detail, in relation to their interpretations of the differential calculus and the Kantian antinomies. These differences of approach were not related to each other directly...

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8. Hegel, Deleuze, and the Structure of the Organism

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pp. 211-238

In the previous chapter, we looked at some of the criticisms that Deleuze levels at Hegel’s logic. It became clear that we could not determine which ontological approach to follow simply by looking at possible incoherencies in their different logical systems...

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Conclusion

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pp. 239-246

We have now come to the end of this exploration of the responses of Hegel and Deleuze to the problem of representation. As has often been noted, Hegel holds an anomalous position in the philosophy of Deleuze.1 The philosophy of Deleuze is...

Notes

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pp. 247-274

Bibliography

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pp. 275-283

Index

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pp. 285-289