Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. ix

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Introduction: The Traditional View

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pp. 1-9

The early nineteenth-century American colleges have been the target of as much criticism as has any segment of American education and, to a significant degree, "good" educational practice and policy for modern times has been defined as the opposite...

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1. The Institutions

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pp. 11-52

In 1923, Donald G. Tewksbury published what has become a classic in the history of American higher education and the major source for those interested in the rationality and stability of antebellum American colleges. The Founding of American Colleges and Universities in the United States was completed...

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2. Enrollments

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pp. 53-89

The thesis that enrollments were declining is critical to the traditional interpretations of the antebellum colleges. Both the intellectual-meritocratic historians such as Hofstadter and egalitarian critics cited studies by Henry Barnard and Francis Wayland to show...

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3. Student Backgrounds

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pp. 90-136

The critics of the early colleges applied the same sets of values, concepts, and assumptions to the study of the students of the antebellum period that they used to interpret the institutions and the enrollment patterns. The result was a picture of a uniform antebellum...

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4. Student Careers

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pp. 137-211

Although the traditional histories of the antebellum colleges relied upon the supposed background characteristics of the students, the most important judgments of the colleges were based upon generalizations concerning the careers of the alumni...

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5. The Colleges in Perspective

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pp. 212-262

The traditional view of antebellum education was made credible by a description of American higher education after the Civil War that was interwoven with the generalizations concerning the oldtime colleges and their students. The failure of the old institutions...

Notes

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pp. 263-297

Appendix A: Schools in Operation 1800–1860

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pp. 299-342

Appendix B: NonCollegiate Institutions

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pp. 343-368

Index

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pp. 369-373