Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. xiii

Illustrations

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pp. xv-xvi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xviii

No scholarly effort could succeed without considerable institutional support. I would like to thank the Hagley Museum and Library for a Grant-in-Aid Fellowship and for putting the considerable resources of their library at my...

Abbreviations

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p. xix

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

On 5 December 1933 an event occurred that was unprecedented in American history: an amendment to the U.S. Constitution was repealed. The Eighteenth (prohibition) Amendment was nullified by the enactment of another...

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1. American Women and the Prohibition Movement

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pp. 9-33

The beginnings of a revolution in American feminist politics started off innocuously enough at a congressional hearing in 1928. At that hearing Ella Boole, president of the WCTU and avid supporter of prohibition, proclaimed...

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2. Women's Politics, Home Protection, and the Morality of Prohibition in the 1920s

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pp. 34-62

At the same time that temperance women were struggling to enact the prohibition amendment, a parallel effort was taking place to gain passage of the woman suffrage amendment. The female constituencies of these two movements...

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3. Women and the Repeal Issue: Three Visions

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pp. 63-89

During the decades of the 1920s and 1930s there was no political issue, with the exception of the Equal Rights Amendment imbroglio, that produced more controversy among women, and revealed more about how women viewed themselves...

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4. The Campaign

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pp. 90-113

Home protectionist ideas continued to dominate the thinking of American women involved in the repeal debate, but these women were now seeing home's most notorious adversary, King Alcohol, in two different guises...

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5. Nonpartisanship, National Politics, and the Momentum for Repeal [Contains Image Plates]

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pp. 114-129

The WONPR demonstrated that a nonpartisan organization based on gender and the engagement of a moral issue was still viable well into the 1930s. The mixture of both Republicans and Democrats that made up the membership...

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6. Aftermath and Conclusion

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pp. 130-147

After the enactment of the Twenty-First Amendment, both prohibition and repeal women turned to other concerns. The activities in which these women became involved are enlightening, reflecting back on the motivations...

Notes

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pp. 149-203

Index

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pp. 205-215