Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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Plates

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pp. viii-viii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xiv

Lockhart Road on Hong Kong island is known to most residents of Hong Kong and, indeed, to many of its visitors. Most would guess correctly that the road is named after a British colonial official. Few would know that there was once another Lockhart Road, further north, in Weihaiwei in Shandong province. The two roads reflect the two appointments in the career of James Stewart Lockhart. ...

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Preface to the Paperback Edition

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pp. xv-xviii

I finished writing Thistle and Bamboo late one night, tears streaming down my cheeks. Years of research were over. I’d told Sir James Stewart Lockhart’s story to the world. It never occurred to me that the published book would fill the next twenty years of my life in an extraordinary manner. ...

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Preface to the Original Edition

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pp. xix-xxii

Serendipity brought me to Stewart Lockhart when, more than a decade ago, a charming gentleman who knew of my interest in Chinese art invited me to see some Chinese paintings held in an Edinburgh school, George Watson's College. The paintings were of great beauty and inspired me to delve further into the collection, discovering as I did so that the works of art were only one small part of a much larger whole which reflected the life of an extraordinary man: Sir James Stewart Lockhart. ...

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1 - Good Abilities (1858-1879)

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pp. 1-13

'The measure of a man's success is not only his words nor even his popularity but largely the example he leaves behind. In your dealings not only with us but with the Chinese you have left behind an example which it will be difficult to follow and which won't be surpassed.'1 Words of high praise are not easy to earn, and, perhaps, even less easy to live up to. Yet this compliment was only one of many . . .

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2 - A Rigorous Training (1879-1884)

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pp. 14-33

Stewart Lockhart's entrance into Hong Kong on 18 November 1879 could hardly have passed unnoticed by the European community there. New arrivals were announced in the newspaper and the arrival of a cadet after so many years without any of these junior officials in the colony was a particularly newsworthy event. The China Mail of 17 November 1879 disclosed 'the arrival by the English Mail Steamer of Mr. Lockhart, a young gentleman ...

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3 - Protector of Chinese (1884-1889)

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pp. 34-53

No sooner had Stewart Lockhart begun to grasp the complexities of the Colonial Secretariat, than he was moved, albeit temporarily. Less than a year after his appointment as Assistant Colonial Secretary he was given the new appointment of Acting Registrar General, the established post at that time being held by Dr F. Stewart. Dr Stewart, a former Inspector of Schools and Acting Colonial Secretary, was Registrar General between 1883 and 1887, ...

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4 - A Family Man (1889-1895)

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pp. 54-75

1889 was a momentous year for Stewart Lockhart. On 12 January he became a member of the Legislative Council and, barely six weeks later, the Hongkong Telegraph announced his marriage: 'on the 25th inst. at St John's Cathedral, by the Rev. W. Jennings, Colonial Chaplain, James Haldane Stewart Lockhart, M. L. C., Registrar General, to Edith Louise Rider, second daughter of Alfred Hancock, Hongkong.'1 ...

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5 - Triumphs and Tribulations (1895-1898)

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pp. 76-92

On 26 March 1895, Stewart Lockhart was finally appointed to the post he had first applied for six years earlier. At the relatively young age of thirty-seven, he had become the Colonial Secretary, and the Governor of Hong Kong's most senior official. The promotion was accompanied by an attendant rise in salary, and henceforth he received an annual salary of HK$9,720, the equivalent of ...

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6 - New Territories, New Horizons (1898-1902)

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pp. 93-109

For the two weeks prior to his departure for Hong Kong, Stewart Lockhart had a series of meetings at the Colonial Office about the New Territories.1 The specific brief sent to him by the Chamberlain2 was privately expanded by him during these meetings, the Colonial Office being of the opinion that Stewart Lockhart 'will be the best judge of what is necessary'.3 In fact, ...

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7 - Breaking Down the Barriers (1902-1904)

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pp. 110-127

When the British Government leased the New Territories it had - in Britain's view - sound mercantile and military grounds for doing so. By comparison, the lease of Weihaiwei was signed for a variety of confusing reasons. The British Government's views on the territory were muddled from the start and the development of Weihaiwei was to suffer accordingly. ...

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8 - Good Companions (1904-1906)

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pp. 128-146

At the end of 1903, Stewart Lockhart wrote to the Colonial Office to inform them that one of his assistants, Walter, proposed to take home leave shortly and that a replacement for him would therefore be required.1 The Commissioner knew exactly who he wanted for the post: Reginald Johnston, a young official in the Hong Kong service whom he had befriended before leaving to serve in Weihaiwei. the Colonial Office was less sure about the suitability of Johnston for the post. ...

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9 - The Scholar-Collector (1907-1912)

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pp. 147-167

By the beginning of 1907, Stewart Lockhart had done virtually all he could for Weihaiwei. The administration was organized on a sound footing, and with Johnston, Walter, and the cadet, Carpmael, in the Weihaiwei service, the territory had sufficient staff to ensure its smooth running. The Commissioner felt himself to be in a stalemate. A tight-fisted treasury, unwilling to advance major expenditure to promote Weihaiwei's growth, and the lack of any security of tenure ...

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10 - A Thankless Task (1911-1918)

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pp. 168-185

Despite the disappointments over promotion, Stewart Lockhart had little time to brood. The first census since his assumption of the administration had to be organized in 1911. Carpmael was given the task of its organization, and in due course produced an admirable statistical report of the territory.1 The population of almost 150,000 comprised fifty-three per cent males, with the eldest resident being aged 103. ...

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11 - Lingering On (1918-1921)

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pp. 186-199

In 1918, Johnston took his leave, traveling as usual in the interior of China. His hankering for employment outside Weihaiwei was as strong as ever, but luck seemed to be against him. he had unsuccessfully applied for the Chair of Chinese at Columbia University at the end of 1917,1 and, as a man who felt he had 'been at Weihaiwei far too long for the good either of himself or the community',2 he also tried to obtain the post of Vice-Chancellor at ....

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12 - The Confucian Comes Home (1921-1937)

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pp. 200-209

The Stewart Lockharts were returning to Britain with little idea of what they were going to do or where they were going to stay. The first priority was to visit family and friends, and to be reunited with all their now grown up children. A huge family gathering was organized for their return to Britain in June, the reuniting of so many relatives quite overwhelming Stewart Lockhart. The company of his children on their own took longer to achieve than the family gathering had, ...

Notes

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pp. 210-237

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 238-248

Index

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pp. 249-261

Plates

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