COVER

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TITLE

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COPYRIGHT

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CONTENTS

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PREFACE

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pp. ix-x

A word on the organization of Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night. This study concentrates on Latina/o literature and some film and photography from the 1940s to the present, focusing chiefly on . . .

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. xi-xi

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Introduction: Critically Inhabiting the Night

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pp. 1-16

Tropes of night in U.S. Latina/o arts take up the stigma of darkness as a condition to be inhabited ethno-racially and philosophically despite claims that the fate of U.S. Latina/os is to conform to an Anglo-American hegemony. Evocations of . . .

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1. Dreaded Non-Identities of Night: Night and Shadows in Chicana/o Cultural Production

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pp. 17-68

Of the more than fifty million Latina/os currently within the continental borders of the United States, Mexican Americans have had a long borderlands history—defined by military battles and treaties in the name of U.S. national . . .

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2. Queer “Tropics” of Night and the Caribe of “American” (Post) Modernism

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pp. 69-134

I turn from night among Chicana/o cultural producers to an investigation of its uses among contemporary queer poets of Hispanic Caribbean descent who are living in the United States and are at least half Anglographic. What I . . .

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3. Postcolonial Pre-Columbian Cosmologies of Night in Contemporary U.S.-Based Central American Texts

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pp. 135-183

Central America is the invisible sleeping giant or the eclipsed celestial body in the study of U.S. Latina/o culture, Latin American culture, and American (United States) culture. I deploy the phrase “sleeping giant” to remind . . .

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4. Transcultural Night Work of U.S.-Based South American Cultural Producers

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pp. 184-244

“Transcultural” is the adjectival form of “transculturation.” The latter term was originally coined in Spanish more than half a century ago by Cuban anthropologist and ethnographer Fernando Ortiz Fernández (1881–1969) to describe . . .

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Conclusion: Two Homelands Have I: “America” and the Night

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pp. 245-254

Night works among Latina/o cultural producers demonstrate that “assimilation” does not have one meaning but several, some of them opposed to one another. “Assimilation” is a commonly used term in U.S. society and has been . . .

NOTES

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pp. 255-271

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 273-288

INDEX

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pp. 289-310