In this Book

Hearing the Hurt
summary
Hearing the Hurt is an examination of how the New Negro movement, also known as the Harlem Renaissance, provoked and sustained public discourse and deliberation about black culture and identity in the early twentieth century.
 
Borrowing its title from a W. E. B. Du Bois essay, Hearing the Hurt explores the nature of rhetorical invention, performance, and mutation by focusing on the multifaceted issues brought forth in the New Negro movement, which Watts treats as a rhetorical struggle over what it means to be properly black and at the same time properly American.
 
Who determines the meaning of blackness? How should African Americans fit in with American public culture? In what way should black communities and families be structured? The New Negro movement animated dynamic tension among diverse characterizations of African American civil rights, intellectual life, and well-being, and thus it provides a fascinating and complex stage on which to study how ideologies clash with each other to become accepted universally.
 
Watts, conceptualizing the artistic culture of the time as directly affected by the New Negro public discourse, maps this rhetorical struggle onto the realm of aesthetics and discusses some key incarnations of New Negro rhetoric in select speeches, essays, and novels.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-8
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. “Hearing the Hurt”
  2. pp. 9-24
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. “Of Beauty and Death”: W. E. B. Du Bois’s Darkwater
  2. pp. 25-49
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. “The Last and Best Gift of Africa”: Du Bois, Dewey, and a Black Public
  2. pp. 50-72
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. “Negro Youth Speaks”: Alain Locke and The New Negro
  2. pp. 73-95
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. “A Lampblacked Anglo-Saxon”: George Schuyler and Langston Hughes in the Nation
  2. pp. 96-116
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. “All Art Is Propaganda”: The Politics of a New Negro Aesthetics
  2. pp. 117-139
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. “Paul’s Committed Suicide”: A Utopist Tragedy in Wallace Thurman’s Infants of the Spring
  2. pp. 140-165
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. “You Mean You Don’t Want Me, ’Rene?”: Anxiety, Desire, and Madness in Nella Larsen’s Passing
  2. pp. 166-189
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Postscript
  2. pp. 190-197
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 199-231
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 233-243
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 245-246
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.